gust
Pronunciation Noun

gust (plural gusts)

  1. A strong, abrupt rush#Noun|rush of wind#Noun|wind.
    Synonyms: windflaw
  2. (by extension) Any rush or outburst (of water#Noun|water, emotion, etc.).
    • 1869 May, Anthony Trollope, “Hard Words”, in He Knew He Was Right, volume I, London: Strahan and Company, publishers, […], OCLC 1118026626 ↗, page 73 ↗:
      The author is not speaking now of actual love-makings, of intrigues and devilish villany, either perpetrated or imagined; but rather of those passing gusts of short-lived and unfounded suspicion to which, as to other accidents, very well-regulated families may occasionally be liable.
Translations Translations
  • Italian: folata, tùrbine, turbinio
  • Russian: поры́в
  • Spanish: ramalazo
Verb

gust (gusts, present participle gusting; past and past participle gusted)

  1. (intransitive, transitive) To blow in gusts.
Translations Noun

gust (uncountable)

  1. (archaic) The physiological faculty of taste.
  2. Relish, enjoyment, appreciation.
    • An ox will relish the tender flesh of kids with as much gust and appetite.
    • 1733, [Alexander Pope], An Essay on Man. […], (please specify ), London: Printed for J[ohn] Wilford, […], OCLC 960856019 ↗:
    • 1942: ‘Yes, indeed,’ said Sava with solemn gust. — Rebecca West, Black Lamb and Grey Falcon (Canongate 2006, p. 1050)
  3. Intellectual taste; fancy.
    • A choice of it may be made according to the gust and manner of the ancients.
Verb

gust (gusts, present participle gusting; past and past participle gusted)

  1. (obsolete, transitive) To taste.
  2. (obsolete, transitive) To have a relish for.
Related terms
Gust
Proper noun
  1. Surname



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