heel
Pronunciation Noun

heel (plural heels)

  1. (anatomy) The rear part of the foot, where it joins the leg.
    • He [the stag] calls to mind his strength and then his speed, / His winged heels and then his armed head.
  2. The part of a shoe's sole which supports the foot's heel.
  3. The rear part of a sock or similar covering for the foot.
  4. The part of the palm of a hand closest to the wrist.
    He drove the heel of his hand into the man's nose.
  5. (usually, in the plural) A woman's high-heeled shoe.
  6. (firearms) The back, upper part of the stock.
  7. The last or lowest part of anything.
    the heel of a mast
    the heel of a vessel
    • the heel of a hunt
  8. (US, Ireland) A crust end-piece of a loaf of bread.
    • 1814 July 6, [Walter Scott], Waverley; or, ’Tis Sixty Years Since. In Three Volumes, volume (please specify ), Edinburgh: Printed by James Ballantyne and Co. for Archibald Constable and Co.; London: Longman, Hurst, Rees, Orme, and Brown, OCLC 270129598 ↗:
  9. (US) The base of a bun sliced in half lengthwise.
  10. A contemptible, inconsiderate or thoughtless person.
  11. (slang, professional wrestling) A headlining wrestler regarded as a "bad guy," whose ring persona embodies villainous or reprehensible traits and demonstrates characteristics of a braggart and a bully.
  12. (card games) The cards set aside for later use in a patience or solitaire game.
  13. Anything resembling a human heel in shape; a protuberance; a knob.
  14. (architecture) The lower end of a timber in a frame, as a post or rafter.
  15. (specifically, US) The obtuse angle of the lower end of a rafter set sloping.
  16. (architecture, workman slang) A cyma reversa.
  17. (carpentry) The short side of an angled cut.
  18. (golf) The part of a club head's face nearest the shaft.
  19. The lower end of the bit (cutting edge) of an axehead; as opposed to the toe (upper end).
  20. In a carding machine, the part of a flat nearest the cylinder.
Synonyms Antonyms
  • (headlining wrestler) babyface
  • (angled cut in carpentry) toe
Translations Translations Translations Translations
  • Italian: poggiaguancia
Translations Translations
  • French: croûton, quignon
  • German: Kanten (regional), (please verify) Knapp#German|Knapp m, Knust (Northern Germany), (please verify) Ranft m, Scherzl (Austria), technical terms in bakery trade: (please verify) Anschnitt m, (please verify) Abschnitt (de) m
  • Italian: cantuccio (di pane)
  • Portuguese: tampa
  • Russian: горбу́шка
  • Spanish: cuscurro, mendrugo
Translations Verb

heel (heels, present participle heeling; past and past participle heeled)

  1. To follow at somebody's heels; to chase closely.
    She called to her dog to heel.
  2. To add a heel to, or increase the size of the heel of (a shoe or boot).
  3. To kick with the heel.
  4. (transitive) To perform by the use of the heels, as in dancing, running, etc.
    • RQ
  5. (transitive) To arm with a gaff, as a cock for fighting.
  6. (golf, transitive) To hit (the ball) with the heel of the club.
  7. (American football, transitive) To make (a fair catch) standing with one foot forward, the heel on the ground and the toe up.
Translations
  • French: talonner
  • German: (jemandem) auf den Fersen sein (with dative)
  • Spanish: seguir de cerca, poner talón o tacón a
Verb

heel (heels, present participle heeling; past and past participle heeled)

  1. (intransitive, especially of ships) To incline to one side; to tilt.
Translations Noun

heel (plural heels)

  1. The act of inclining or canting from a vertical position; a cant.
    The ship gave a heel to port.
Synonyms
  • heeling
Verb

heel (heels, present participle heeling; past heeled, past participle heeled)

  1. (rare, now especially in the phrase "heel in") altform en.
    • 1911, Biennial Report of the State Geologist, North Carolina Geological Survey Section, page 92:
      They should be dug up with a sharp mattock or grub hoe, the roots being broken as little as possible, and they should be heeled in a a cool place and protected from the sun until ready to plant. When lifted for planting from the trench in which heeled the roots should be kept covered with a wet sack.
    • 1913, Indian School Journal, page 142:
      In the late fall the seedlings may be dug and heeled in very closely until all the leaves have dropped.
    • 1916, Transactions of the Indiana Horticultural Society, page 111:
      Member: Did you water the trees when you set them out?
      Walter Vonnegut: No; I heeled the trees in as soon as they were received.
    • 1937, Robert Wilson, Ernest John George, Planting and care of shelterbelts on the northern Great Plains, page 15:
      If trees are received from the nursery in the fall, they should be carefully heeled in until the planting season opens in the spring.
    • 1976, Keith W. Dorman, The Genetics and Breeding of Southern Pines, page 66:
      Place seedlings in the trench. Small-stemmed seedlings may be heeled-in in bunches of 25, but large seedlings should be heeled-in loose.
    • , Brian Kerr, Lodge St Lawrence 144 Ritual, page 34:
      [I] of my own free will and accord, do hereby, here at and hereon, solemnly swear that I will always heel, conceal and never improperly reveal any of the secrets or mysteries of, or belonging to [the Masons].

Heel
Proper noun
  1. A part of Maasgouw in the Netherlands



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