honey
Pronunciation Noun

honey (uncountable)

  1. (uncountable) A viscous, sweet fluid produced from plant nectar by bees. Often used to sweeten tea or to spread on baked goods.
  2. (countable) A variety of this substance.
  3. (rare) Nectar.
  4. (figuratively) Something sweet or desirable.
    • 1595, William Shakespeare, Romeo and Juliet, Act 5, Scene 3, lines 91–93:
      O my love, my wife! / Death, that hath suck'd the honey of thy breath / Hath had no power yet upon thy beauty.
    • 1613, William Shakespeare; [John Fletcher], “The Famous History of the Life of King Henry the Eight”, in Mr. William Shakespeares Comedies, Histories, & Tragedies: Published According to the True Originall Copies (First Folio), London: Printed by Isaac Iaggard, and Ed[ward] Blount, published 1623, OCLC 606515358 ↗, [Act III, scene ii]:
      the honey of his language
  5. A term of affection.
    Honey, would you take out the trash?
    Honey, I'm home.
  6. (countable, informal) A woman, especially an attractive one.
    Man, there are some fine honeys here tonight!
  7. A spectrum of pale yellow to brownish-yellow colour, like that of most types of (the sweet substance) honey.
     
Synonyms Translations Translations
  • Spanish: dulzura
Translations Translations
  • Portuguese: mel
  • Russian: медо́вый
  • Spanish: miel
Adjective

honey (not comparable)

  1. Involving or resembling honey.
    • 1599 William Shakespeare, Henry V, act 1, scene 2:
      So work the honey-bees, / Creatures that by a rule in nature teach / The act of order to a peopled kingdom.
  2. Of a pale yellow to brownish-yellow colour, like most types of honey.
Translations
  • Russian: медо́вый
Verb

honey (honeys, present participle honeying; past and past participle honeyed)

  1. (transitive) To sweeten; to make agreeable.
  2. (intransitive) To be gentle, agreeable, or coaxing; to talk fondly; to use endearments.
    • c. 1599–1602, William Shakespeare, “The Tragedie of Hamlet, Prince of Denmarke”, in Mr. William Shakespeares Comedies, Histories, & Tragedies: Published According to the True Originall Copies (First Folio), London: Printed by Isaac Iaggard, and Ed[ward] Blount, published 1623, OCLC 606515358 ↗, [Act III, scene iv]:
      Honeying and making love.
  3. (intransitive) To be or become obsequiously courteous or complimentary; to fawn.
    • 1847, Alfred Tennyson, The Princess: A Medley, London: Edward Moxon, […], OCLC 2024748 ↗, prologue, page 6 ↗:
      [O]ne / Discuss'd his tutor, rough to common men / But honeying at the whisper of a lord; / And one the Master, as a rogue in grain / Veneer'd with sanctimonious theory.
Related terms
Honey
Proper noun
  1. Surname



This text is extracted from the Wiktionary and it is available under the CC BY-SA 3.0 license | Terms and conditions | Privacy policy 0.019
Offline English dictionary