honour
Pronunciation
  • IPA: /ˈɒnə(ɹ)/
Noun

honour

  1. British spelling, Canadian spelling, Commonwealth of Nations, and Ireland standard spelling of honor#English|honor.
    • 1902, Richard Francis Weymouth, Translation of the New Testament of the Bible, Book 60, 1 Peter 2:4:
      Come to Him, the ever-living Stone, rejected indeed by men as worthless, but in God's esteem chosen and held in honour.
    • 1591, William Shakespeare, “The Second Part of Henry the Sixt, […]”, in Mr. William Shakespeares Comedies, Histories, & Tragedies: Published According to the True Originall Copies (First Folio), London: Printed by Isaac Iaggard, and Ed[ward] Blount, published 1623, OCLC 606515358 ↗, [Act II, scene i]:
      Noble she is, but if she have forgot
      Honour and virtue, and convers'd with such
      As, like to pitch, defile nobility,
      I banish her my bed and company.
    • 1667, John Milton, “Book 4”, in Paradise Lost. A Poem Written in Ten Books, London: Printed [by Samuel Simmons], and are to be sold by Peter Parker […] [a]nd by Robert Boulter […] [a]nd Matthias Walker, […], OCLC 228722708 ↗; republished as Paradise Lost in Ten Books: The Text Exactly Reproduced from the First Edition of 1667: […], London: Basil Montagu Pickering […], 1873, OCLC 230729554 ↗:
      Godlike erect, with native honour clad.
Antonyms Verb

honour (honours, present participle honouring; past and past participle honoured)

  1. British spelling, Canadian spelling, Commonwealth of Nations, and Ireland standard spelling of honor#English|honor.

Honour
Proper noun
  1. A female given name, a less common spelling of Honor.



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