inward
Pronunciation
  • (British) IPA: /ˈɪnwəd/

Adjective

inward

  1. Situated on the inside; that is within, inner; belonging to the inside. [from 9th c.]
  2. (obsolete) Intimate, closely acquainted; familiar. [16th-17th c.]
    • 1603, Michel de Montaigne, chapter 3, in John Florio, transl., The Essayes, […], book II, printed at London: By Val[entine] Simmes for Edward Blount […], OCLC 946730821 ↗:
      There is nothing can be added unto the daintinesse of Fulvius wives death, who was so inward with Augustus.
    • 1611, The Holy Bible, […] (King James Version), imprinted at London: By Robert Barker, […], OCLC 964384981 ↗, Job 19:19 ↗:
      All my inward friends abhorred me.
    • He had had occasion, by one very inward with him, to know in part the discourse of his life.
Translations
Adverb

inward

  1. Towards the inside. [from 11th c.]
    • 1667, John Milton, “Book 3”, in Paradise Lost. A Poem Written in Ten Books, London: Printed [by Samuel Simmons], and are to be sold by Peter Parker […] [a]nd by Robert Boulter […] [a]nd Matthias Walker, […], OCLC 228722708 ↗; republished as Paradise Lost in Ten Books: The Text Exactly Reproduced from the First Edition of 1667: […], London: Basil Montagu Pickering […], 1873, OCLC 230729554 ↗:
      So much the rather, thou Celestial Light, / Shine inward.
Translations
Noun

inward (plural inwards)

  1. (obsolete, chiefly, in the plural) That which is inward or within; the inner parts or organs of the body; the viscera.
    • 1667, John Milton, “Book 10”, in Paradise Lost. A Poem Written in Ten Books, London: Printed [by Samuel Simmons], and are to be sold by Peter Parker […] [a]nd by Robert Boulter […] [a]nd Matthias Walker, […], OCLC 228722708 ↗; republished as Paradise Lost in Ten Books: The Text Exactly Reproduced from the First Edition of 1667: […], London: Basil Montagu Pickering […], 1873, OCLC 230729554 ↗:
      Then sacrificing, laid the inwards and their fat.
  2. (obsolete, chiefly, in the plural) The mental faculties.
  3. (obsolete) A familiar friend or acquaintance.
    • c. 1603–1604, William Shakespeare, “Measvre for Measure”, in Mr. William Shakespeares Comedies, Histories, & Tragedies: Published According to the True Originall Copies (First Folio), London: Printed by Isaac Iaggard, and Ed[ward] Blount, published 1623, OCLC 606515358 ↗, [Act III, scene ii]:
      I was an inward of his.



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