jet
Pronunciation Noun

jet (plural jets)

  1. A collimated stream, spurt or flow of liquid or gas from a pressurized container, an engine, etc.
  2. A spout or nozzle for creating a jet of fluid.
  3. (aviation) A type of airplane using jet engines rather than propellers.
  4. An engine that propels a vehicle using a stream of fluid as propulsion.
    1. A turbine.
    2. A rocket engine.
  5. A part of a carburetor that controls the amount of fuel mixed with the air.
  6. (physics) A narrow cone of hadrons and other particles produced by the hadronization of a quark or gluon.
  7. (dated) Drift; scope; range, as of an argument.
  8. (printing, dated) The sprue of a type, which is broken from it when the type is cold.
Translations Translations Translations
  • Russian: реакти́вный дви́гатель
Translations
  • French: gicleur
  • Russian: жиклёр
Verb

jet (jets, present participle jetting; past and past participle jetted)

  1. (intransitive) To spray out of a container.
  2. (transitive) To spray with liquid from a container.
    Farmers may either dip or jet sheep with chemicals.
  3. (intransitive) To travel on a jet aircraft or otherwise by jet propulsion
  4. (intransitive) To move (running, walking etc.) rapidly around
  5. To shoot forward or out; to project; to jut out.
    • 1724, Charles Johnson, “Of Captain Bartho[lomew] Roberts, and His Crew”, in A General History of the Pyrates, […], 2nd edition, London: Printed for, and sold by T. Warner, […], OCLC 2276353 ↗, page 214 ↗:
      The Town has the outer Branch of the River behind it, and the Harbour before it, jetting into which latter are cloſe Keys for the weighing and receiving of Cuſtomage on Merchandize, and for the meeting and conferring of Merchants and Traders.
  6. To strut; to walk with a lofty or haughty gait; to be insolent; to obtrude.
    • c. 1593, William Shakespeare, Titus Andronicus, Act II Scene 1,
      Why, lords, and think you not how dangerous
      It is to jet upon a prince’s right?
    • c. 1602, William Shakespeare, Twelfth Night, Act II Scene 5,
      Contemplation makes a rare turkey-cock of him: how he jets under his advanced plumes!
  7. To jerk; to jolt; to be shaken.
    • 1719, Richard Wiseman, Serjeant-Chirurgeon to King Charles II, Eight Chirurgical Treatises, London: B. Tooke et al., 5th edition, Volume 2, Book 5, Chapter 4, p. 78,
      A Lady was wounded down the whole Length of the Forehead to the Nose […] It happened to her travelling in a Hackney-Coach, upon the jetting whereof she was thrown out of the hinder Seat against a Bar of Iron in the forepart of the Coach.
  8. To adjust the fuel to air ratio of a carburetor; to install or adjust a carburetor jet
  9. (slang) To leave.
Translations Translations Adjective

jet (not comparable)

  1. Propelled by turbine engines.
    jet airplane
Translations
  • French: à réaction
  • Russian: реакти́вный
  • Spanish: a chorro, a propulsión, a reacción
Noun

jet (plural jets)

  1. A hard, black form of coal, sometimes used in jewellery.
    Hypernyms: lignite, mineraloid
    • 1735, [John Barrow], “JEAT ↗”, in Dictionarium Polygraphicum: Or, The Whole Body of Arts Regularly Digested. [...], volume II (I–S), London: Printed for C[harles] Hitch and C[harles] Davis […], and S[amuel] Austen […], OCLC 987025732 ↗:
      There is also a factitious jeat made of glaſs, in imitation of the mineral jeat.
  2. (color) The colour of jet coal, deep grey.
     
Translations Translations Adjective

jet (not comparable)

  1. Very dark black in colour.
    • 1939, Raymond Chandler, The Big Sleep, Penguin 2011, p. 23:
      She was an ash blonde with greenish eyes, beaded lashes, hair waved smoothly back from ears in which large jet buttons glittered.
Translations
Jet
Proper noun
  1. (uncountable) A town in Oklahoma.
  2. (countable) A unisex given name.



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