jibe
Pronunciation Noun

jibe (plural jibes)

  1. A facetious or insulting#Adjective|insulting remark#Noun|remark; a jeer#Noun|jeer, a taunt#Noun|taunt.
    He flung subtle jibes at her until she couldn’t bear to work with him any longer.
    • c. 1599–1602, William Shakespeare, The Tragicall Historie of Hamlet, Prince of Denmarke: […] (Second Quarto), London: Printed by I[ames] R[oberts] for N[icholas] L[ing] […], published 1604, OCLC 760858814 ↗, [Act V, scene i] ↗:
      Alas poore Yoricke, […] where be your gibes now? your gamboles? your ſongs? your flaſhes of merriment, that were wont to ſet the table on a roare, not one now to mocke your owne grinning, quite chapfallen#English|chopfalne.
    • 1862, Christina Rossetti, “Goblin Market”, in Goblin Market and Other Poems, Cambridge; London: Macmillan & Co., […], OCLC 36794247 ↗, pages 24–25 ↗:
      She ran and ran / As if she feared some goblin man / Dogged her with gibe or curse / Or something worse: {{...}
    • 1903 April 18, W[illiam] E[dward] Burghardt Du Bois, “Of Alexander Crummell”, in The Souls of Black Folk: Essays and Sketches, Chicago, Ill.: A[lexander] C[aldwell] McClurg & Co., OCLC 728542745 ↗, page 226 ↗:
      He bent to all the gibes and prejudices, to all hatred and discrimination, with that rare courtesy which is the armor of pure souls.
    • 1920 April, F[rancis] Scott Fitzgerald, “Amory, Son of Beatrice”, in This Side of Paradise, New York, N.Y.: Charles Scribner’s Sons, OCLC 249911691 ↗, book I (The Romantic Egotist), page 26 ↗:
      He had written two novels: one of them violently anti-Catholic, just before his conversion, and five years later another, in which he had attempted to turn all his clever jibes against Catholics into even cleverer innuendoes against Episcopalians.
Translations Verb

jibe (jibes, present participle jibing; past and past participle jibed)

  1. (transitive) To reproach#Verb|reproach with contemptuous word#Noun|words; to deride, to mock#Verb|mock, to taunt#Verb|taunt.
    Synonyms: flout
    • c. 1606–1607, William Shakespeare, “The Tragedie of Anthonie and Cleopatra”, in Mr. William Shakespeares Comedies, Histories, & Tragedies: Published According to the True Originall Copies (First Folio), London: Printed by Isaac Iaggard, and Ed[ward] Blount, published 1623, OCLC 606515358 ↗, [Act II, scene ii], page 346 ↗, column 1:
      [Y]ou / Did pocket vp my Letters: and with taunts / Did gibe my missive#English|Miſive out of audience.
  2. (transitive) To say#Verb|say in a mocking#Adjective|mocking or taunting#Adjective|taunting manner.
    • 1936 June 30, Margaret Mitchell, chapter VI, in Gone with the Wind, New York, N.Y.: The Macmillan Company, OCLC 1049770437 ↗; republished New York, N.Y.: The Macmillan Company, 1944, OCLC 20350211 ↗, part I, page 121 ↗:
      Scarlett felt her heart begin its mad racing again and she clutched her hand against it unconsciously, as if she would squeeze it into submission. "Eavesdroppers often hear highly instructive things," jibed a memory.
  3. (intransitive) To make a mocking remark#Noun|remark or remarks; to jeer#Verb|jeer.
    • c. 1595–1596, W. Shakespere [i.e., William Shakespeare], A Pleasant Conceited Comedie Called, Loues Labors Lost. […] (First Quarto), imprinted in London: By W[illiam] W[hite] for Cut[h]bert Burby, published 1598, OCLC 61366361 ↗, [Act V, scene ii] ↗:
      Why thats the way to choake a gibing ſpirrit, / Whoſe influence is begot of that looſe grace, / Which ſhallow laughing hearers giue to fooles, {{...}
    • 1722 (indicated as 1721), [Daniel Defoe], The Fortunes and Misfortunes of the Famous Moll Flanders, &c. […], London: Printed for, and sold by W[illiam Rufus] Chetwood, […]; And T. Edling, […], OCLC 723450724 ↗; 3rd corrected edition, London: Printed for, and sold by, W[illiam Rufus] Chetwood, […]; and T. Edlin, […]; W[illiam] Mears, […]; J. Brotherton, […]; C. King, and J. Stags, […], 1722, OCLC 745118774 ↗, page 6 ↗:
      This ſet the old Gentlewoman a Laughing at me, as you may be ſure it would: Well, Madam, Forſooth, ſays ſhe, Gibing at me, you would be a Gentlewoman, and how will you come to be a Gentlewoman? What will you do it by your Fingers Ends?
Verb

jibe (jibes, present participle jibing; past and past participle jibed)

  1. (intransitive, Canada, US, informal) To accord#Verb|accord or agree.
    That explanation doesn’t jibe with the facts.
Translations Noun

jibe (plural jibes)

  1. (nautical, now, chiefly, US) Alternative spelling of gybe
Verb

jibe (jibes, present participle jibing; past and past participle jibed)

  1. (nautical, now, chiefly, US) Alternative spelling of gybe



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