judgment
Pronunciation
  • enPR: jŭj'mənt, IPA: /ˈdʒʌdʒ.mənt/
Noun

judgment

  1. The act of judging.
  2. The power or faculty of performing such operations; especially, when unqualified, the faculty of judging or deciding rightly, justly, or wisely
    a man of judgment
    a politician without judgment
    • 1611, The Holy Bible, […] (King James Version), imprinted at London: By Robert Barker, […], OCLC 964384981 ↗, Psalms 72:2 ↗:
      He shall judge thy people with righteousness and thy poor with judgment.
    • c. 1595–1596, William Shakespeare, “A Midsommer Nights Dreame”, in Mr. William Shakespeares Comedies, Histories, & Tragedies: Published According to the True Originall Copies (First Folio), London: Printed by Isaac Iaggard, and Ed[ward] Blount, published 1623, OCLC 606515358 ↗, [Act 1, scene 1]:
      Hermia. I would my father look'd but with my eyes. Theseus. Rather your eyes must with his judgment look.
  3. The conclusion or result of judging; an opinion; a decision.
    • 1589–93 William Shakespeare, Two Gentlemen of Verona, IV:iv
      She in my judgment was as fair as you.
    • 1609, William Shakespeare, Sonnet 14:
      Not from the stars do I my judgment pluck;
      And yet methinks I have astronomy ...
  4. (legal) The act of determining, as in courts of law, what is conformable to law and justice; also, the determination, decision, or sentence of a court, or of a judge.
    • In judgments between rich and poor, consider not what the poor man needs, but what is his own.
    • , Shakespeare, Merchant of Venice, IV-i
      Most heartily I do beseech the court To give the judgment.
  5. (theology) The final award; the last sentence.
Translations Translations Translations Translations Translations


This text is extracted from the Wiktionary and it is available under the CC BY-SA 3.0 license | Terms and conditions | Privacy policy 0.003
Offline English dictionary