lag
Pronunciation
  • (British, America) IPA: /læɡ/
Adjective

lag

  1. late
  2. (obsolete) Last; long-delayed.
    • c. 1597, William Shakespeare, “The First Part of Henry the Fourth, […]”, in Mr. William Shakespeares Comedies, Histories, & Tragedies: Published According to the True Originall Copies (First Folio), London: Printed by Isaac Iaggard, and Ed[ward] Blount, published 1623, OCLC 606515358 ↗, [Act V, scene i]:
      the lag end of my life
  3. Last made; hence, made of refuse; inferior.
    • lag souls
Noun

lag

  1. (countable) A gap, a delay; an interval created by something not keeping up; a latency.
    • 2004, May 10. The New Yorker Online,
      During the Second World War, for instance, the Washington Senators had a starting rotation that included four knuckleball pitchers. But, still, I think that some of that was just a generational lag.
  2. (uncountable) Delay; latency.
    • 2001, Patricia M. Wallace, The psychology of the Internet
      When the lag is low, 2 or 3 seconds perhaps, Internet chatters seem reasonably content.
    • 2002, Marty Cortinas, Clifford Colby, The Macintosh bible
      Latency, or lag, is an unavoidable part of Internet gaming.
  3. (British, slang, archaic) One sentenced to transportation for a crime.
  4. (British, slang) a prisoner, a criminal.
    • 1934, P. G. Wodehouse, Thank You, Jeeves
      On both these occasions I had ended up behind the bars, and you might suppose that an old lag like myself would have been getting used to it by now.
  5. (snooker) A method of deciding which player shall start. Both players simultaneously strike a cue ball from the baulk line to hit the top cushion and rebound down the table; the player whose ball finishes closest to the baulk cushion wins.
  6. One who lags; that which comes in last.
    • 1725, Homer; [William Broome], transl., “Book IX”, in The Odyssey of Homer. […], volume II, London: Printed for Bernard Lintot, OCLC 8736646 ↗, line 526, page 226 ↗:
      the lag of all the flock
  7. The fag-end; the rump; hence, the lowest class.
    • c. 1605–1608, William Shakespeare, “The Life of Tymon of Athens”, in Mr. William Shakespeares Comedies, Histories, & Tragedies: Published According to the True Originall Copies (First Folio), London: Printed by Isaac Iaggard, and Ed[ward] Blount, published 1623, OCLC 606515358 ↗, [Act III, scene vi], page 89 ↗, column 2:
      The reſt of your Fees, O Gods, the Senators of Athens, together with the common lagge of People, what is amiſſe in them, you Gods, make ſuteable for deſtruction.
  8. A stave of a cask, drum, etc.; especially (engineering) one of the narrow boards or staves forming the covering of a cylindrical object, such as a boiler, or the cylinder of a carding machine or steam engine.
  9. A bird, the greylag.
Synonyms Translations Verb

lag (lags, present participle lagging; past and past participle lagged)

  1. to fail to keep up (the pace), to fall behind
    • 1596, Edmund Spenser, The Faerie Queene, Canto I
      Behind her farre away a Dwarfe did lag, / That lasie seemd in being ever last, / Or wearied with bearing of her bag / Of needments at his backe.
    • 1717, The Metamorphoses of Ovid translated into English verse under the direction of Sir Samuel Garth by John Dryden, Alexander Pope, Joseph Addison, William Congreve and other eminent hands
      While he, whose tardy feet had lagg'd behind, / Was doom'd the sad reward of death to find.
    • 2004, — The New Yorker, 5 April 2004
      Over the next fifty years, by most indicators dear to economists, the country remained the richest in the world. But by another set of numbers—longevity and income inequality—it began to lag behind Northern Europe and Japan.
  2. to cover (for example, pipes) with felt strips or similar material
    (referring to a time lag effect in thermal transfer)
    • c. 1974, Philip Larkin, The Building
      Outside seems old enough: / Red brick, lagged pipes, and someone walking by it / Out to the car park, free.
  3. (UK, slang, archaic) To transport as a punishment for crime.
    • She lags us if we poach.
  4. (transitive) To cause to lag; to slacken.
    • To lag his flight.
Translations
LAG
Adjective

lag

  1. (poker) Loose (inclined to play many starting hands, including weak ones) and aggressive (inclined to raise often).
Antonyms
  • TAG tight-aggressive



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