languor
Pronunciation
  • (RP) IPA: /ˈlæŋɡə/
  • (GA) IPA: /ˈlæŋ(ɡ)ɚ/
Noun

languor

  1. (uncountable) A state#Noun|state of the body or mind#Noun|mind cause#Verb|caused by exhaustion or disease#Noun|disease and characterized by a languid or weary feeling#Noun|feeling; lassitude; (countable) an instance of this.
    Synonyms: torpor
    languor of convalescence
    • 1818, [Mary Shelley], chapter IV, in Frankenstein; or, The Modern Prometheus. In Three Volumes, volume I, London: Printed [by Macdonald and Son] for Lackington, Hughes, Harding, Mavor, & Jones, OCLC 830979744 ↗, [https://babel.hathitrust.org/cgi/pt?id=emu.010001278701;view=1up;seq=118 pages 101–102]:
      Sometimes my pulse beat so quickly and hardly, that I felt the palpitation of every artery; at others, I nearly sank to the ground through languor and extreme weakness.
  2. (uncountable) Melancholy caused by lovesickness, sadness, etc.; (countable) an instance of this.
  3. (uncountable) Dullness, sluggishness; lack#Noun|lack of vigour; stagnation.
    • 1818, [Mary Shelley], chapter VI, in Frankenstein; or, The Modern Prometheus. In Three Volumes, volume III, London: Printed [by Macdonald and Son] for Lackington, Hughes, Harding, Mavor, & Jones, OCLC 830979744 ↗, [https://babel.hathitrust.org/cgi/pt?id=emu.010001278703;view=1up;seq=128 page 120]:
      I rushed towards her, and embraced her with ardour; but the deathly languor and coldness of the limbs told me, that what I now held in my arms had ceased to be the Elizabeth whom I had loved and cherished.
  4. (uncountable) Listless indolence or inactivity, especially if enjoyable or relaxing#Adjective|relaxing; dreaminess; (countable) an instance of this.
    • 1945, Evelyn Waugh, chapter 4, in Brideshead Revisited […], 3rd edition, London: Chapman & Hall, OCLC 54130892 ↗, book 1 (Et in Arcadia Ego), pages 70–71 ↗:
      The languor of Youth—how unique and quintessential it is! How quickly, how irrecoverably lost! The zest, the generous affections, the illusions, the despair, all the traditional attributes of Youth—all save this—come and go with us through life; [...] but languor—the relaxation of yet unwearied sinews, the mind sequestered and self-regarding, the sun standing still in the heavens and the earth throbbing to our own pulse—that belongs to Youth alone and dies with it.
  5. (uncountable) Heavy humidity and stillness of the air#Noun|air.
  6. (uncountable, obsolete) sorrow#Noun|Sorrow; suffering#Noun|suffering; also, enfeebling disease or illness; (countable, obsolete) an instance of this.
Related terms

Translations Verb

languor (languors, present participle languoring; past and past participle languored)

  1. (intransitive) To languish.



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