last
Pronunciation
  • (RP) enPR: läst, IPA: /lɑːst/
  • (GA) enPR: lăst, IPA: /læst/
  • (Northern England) IPA: /last/
  • (Scotland) IPA: /ɫast/
Adjective

last (not comparable)

  1. Final, ultimate, coming after all others of its kind.
    “Eyes Wide Shut” was the last film to be directed by Stanley Kubrick.
  2. Most recent, latest, last so far.
    The last time I saw him, he was married.
    I have received your note dated the 17th last, and am responding to say that […] .   (archaic usage)
  3. Farthest of all from a given quality, character, or condition; most unlikely, or least preferable.
    He is the last person to be accused of theft.
    The last person I want to meet is Helen.
    More rain is the last thing we need right now.
  4. Being the only one remaining of its class.
    Japan is the last empire.
  5. Supreme; highest in degree; utmost.
    • Contending for principles of the last importance.
  6. Lowest in rank or degree.
    the last prize
Synonyms Translations Translations Translations Determiner
  1. The (one) immediately before the present.
    We went there last year.
  2. (of a, day of the week) Closest to seven days (one week) ago.
    It's Wednesday, and the party was last Tuesday; that is, not yesterday, but eight days ago.
Translations
  • German: letzter
  • Russian: про́шлый
Adverb

last (not comparable)

  1. Most recently.
    When we last met, he was based in Toronto.
    • c. 1591–1595, William Shakespeare, “The Tragedie of Romeo and Ivliet”, in Mr. William Shakespeares Comedies, Histories, & Tragedies: Published According to the True Originall Copies (First Folio), London: Printed by Isaac Iaggard, and Ed[ward] Blount, published 1623, OCLC 606515358 ↗, [Act I, scene v]:
      How long is't now since last yourself and I / Were in a mask?
  2. (sequence) after everything else; finally
    I'll go last.
    last but not least
    • Pleased with his idol, he commends, admires, / Adores; and, last, the thing adored desires.
Synonyms Translations
  • French: en dernier, finalement
  • German: zuletzt
  • Italian: per ultimo
  • Portuguese: por último
  • Russian: по́сле всех
Translations
  • French: finalement
  • German: zuletzt
  • Italian: infine, alla fine
  • Portuguese: por último
  • Russian: в заключе́ние
Verb

last (lasts, present participle lasting; past and past participle lasted)

  1. (transitive, obsolete) To perform, carry out.
  2. (intransitive) To endure, continue over time.
    Summer seems to last longer each year.
    They seem happy now, but that won't last long.
    • 1913, Mrs. [Marie] Belloc Lowndes, chapter I, in The Lodger, London: Methuen, OCLC 7780546 ↗; republished in Novels of Mystery: The Lodger; The Story of Ivy; What Really Happened, New York, N.Y.: Longmans, Green and Co., […], [1933], OCLC 2666860 ↗, page 0016 ↗:
      Thus the red damask curtains which now shut out the fog-laden, drizzling atmosphere of the Marylebone Road, had cost a mere song, and yet they might have been warranted to last another thirty years. A great bargain also had been the excellent Axminster carpet which covered the floor; […].
  3. (intransitive) To hold out, continue undefeated or entire.
    I don't know how much longer we can last without reinforcements.
Synonyms Antonyms Related terms Translations Translations Noun

last (plural lasts)

  1. A tool for shaping or preserving the shape of shoes.
    • 2006, Newman, Cathy, Every Shoe Tells a Story, National Geographic (September, 2006), 83,
      How is an in-your-face black leather thigh-high lace-up boot with a four-inch spike heel like a man's black calf lace-up oxford? They are both made on a last, the wood or plastic foot-shaped form that leather is stretched over and shaped to make a shoe.
Translations Verb

last (lasts, present participle lasting; past and past participle lasted)

  1. To shape with a last; to fasten or fit to a last; to place smoothly on a last.
    to last a boot
Noun

last (plural lasts)

  1. (obsolete) A burden; load; a cargo; freight.
  2. (obsolete) A measure of weight or quantity, varying in designation depending on the goods concerned.
    • 1624, John Smith, Generall Historie, in Kupperman 1988, page 114:
      Now we so quietly followed our businesse, that in three moneths wee made three or foure Last of Tarre, Pitch, and Sope ashes [...].
    • 1866, James Edwin Thorold Rogers, A History of Agriculture and Prices in England, Volume 1, page 169,
      The last of wool is twelve sacks.
  3. (obsolete) An old English (and Dutch) measure of the carrying capacity of a ship, equal to two tons.
  4. A load of some commodity with reference to its weight and commercial value.



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