list
Pronunciation
Noun

list (plural lists)

  1. A strip#Noun|strip of fabric, especially from the edge#Noun|edge of a piece#Noun|piece of cloth.
    • c. 1603–1604, William Shakespeare, “Measvre for Measure”, in Mr. William Shakespeares Comedies, Histories, & Tragedies: Published According to the True Originall Copies (First Folio), London: Printed by Isaac Iaggard, and Ed[ward] Blount, published 1623, OCLC 606515358 ↗, [Act I, scene ii], lines 27–34, page 62 ↗, column 1:
      1. Gent[leman]. Well: there went but a paire of shears#English|ſheeres betweene vs. / Luc[io]. I grant: as there may betweene the Liſts, and the velvet#English|Veluet. Thou art the Liſt. / 1. Gent. And thou the Veluet. Thou art good Veluet; thou'rt a three piled#English|pild-piece I warrant thee: I had as lief#English|liefe be a Lyſt of an Engliſh kersey#English|Kerſey, as be pil'd, as thou art pil'd, for a French Veluet. Do I ſpeake feelingly now?
      1st Gentleman. Well, you and I are cut from the same cloth. / Lucio. I agree: just as the lists [scraps from the edge of the cloth] and the velvet are from the same cloth. You are the list. / 1st Gentleman. And you are the velvet. You are good velvet; you are a three-piled piece, I'll bet. I would willingly be a list of an English kersey, than be full of piles [haemorrhoids], as you are piled, like a French velvet. Do I speak feelingly now?
  2. material#Noun|Material used for cloth selvage.
  3. A register#Noun|register or roll#Noun|roll of paper#Noun|paper consisting of a compilation or enumeration of a set#Noun|set of possible items; the compilation or enumeration itself. [from 1600]
    • 1625, Francis Bacon, “Of Youth and Age. XLII.”, in The Essayes or Covncils, Civill and Moral, […] Newly Written, London: Printed by Iohn Haviland for Hanna Barret, OCLC 863521290 ↗; newly enlarged edition, London: Printed by Iohn Haviland, […], 1632, OCLC 863527675 ↗, pages 247–248 ↗:
      Natures that haue much Heat, and great and violent deſires and Perturbations, are not ripe for Action, till they haue paſſed the Meridian of their yeares: As it was with Iulius Cæſar, and Septimius Seuerus. […] And yet he [Septimus Severus] was the Ableſt Emperour, almoſt, of all the Liſt.
    • 1843 December 18, Charles Dickens, “Stave I. Marley’s Ghost.”, in A Christmas Carol. In Prose. Being a Ghost Story of Christmas, London: Chapman & Hall, […], OCLC 55746801 ↗, pages 11–12 ↗:
      "Scrooge and Marley's, I believe," said one of the gentlemen, referring to his list. "Have I the pleasure of addressing Mr. Scrooge, or Mr. Marley?"
  4. (in the plural, historical) The barriers or palisades used to fence off a space#Noun|space for jousting#Noun|jousting or tilting#Noun|tilting tournaments.
    • circa 1595 William Shakespeare, Richard II (play), Act I, Scene 3,
      On pain of death, no person be so bold
      Or daring-hardy as to touch the lists,
      Except the marshal and such officers
      Appointed to direct these fair designs.
    • 1662, [Samuel Butler], “[The First Part of Hudibras]”, in Hudibras. The First and Second Parts. […], London: Printed by T[homas] N[ewcomb] for John Martyn and Henry Herringman, […], published 1678, OCLC 890163163 ↗; republished in A[lfred] R[ayney] Waller, editor, Hudibras: Written in the Time of the Late Wars, Cambridge: At the University Press, 1905, OCLC 963614346 ↗, canto II, page 32 ↗:
      With Truncheon tip'd with Iron head, / The Warrior to the Lists [he] led; {{...}
    • 1715, Homer; [Alexander] Pope, transl., “Book III”, in The Iliad of Homer, volume I, London: Printed by W[illiam] Bowyer, for Bernard Lintott between the Temple-Gates, OCLC 670734254 ↗, lines 319–323, page 16 ↗:
      Ariſe, O Father of the Trojan State! / The Nations call, thy joyful People wait, / To ſeal the Truce and end the dire Debate. / Paris thy Son, and Sparta’s King advance, / In meaſur’d Liſts to toſs the weighty Lance; {{...}
    • 1820, Walter Scott, chapter VIII, in Ivanhoe; a Romance. [...] In Three Volumes, volume I, Edinburgh: Printed for Archibald Constable and Co.; London: Hurst, Robinson, and Co. […], OCLC 230694662 ↗, page 139 ↗:
      William de Wyvil, and Stephen de Martival, […] armed at all points, rode up and down the lists to enforce and preserve good order among the spectators.
  5. (computing, programming) A codified#Adjective|codified representation of a list used to store#Verb|store data or in processing#Noun|processing; especially, in the LISP programming language, a data structure consisting of a sequence#Noun|sequence of zero or more items.
  6. (architecture) A little square#Adjective|square moulding#Noun|moulding; a fillet or listel.
  7. (carpentry) A narrow#Adjective|narrow strip of wood, especially sapwood, cut from the edge of a board#Noun|board or plank#Noun|plank.
  8. (ropemaking) A piece of woollen#Adjective|woollen cloth with which the yarns are grasp#Verb|grasped by a worker.
  9. (tin-plate manufacture) The first#Adjective|first thin coating#Noun|coating of tin; a wire#Noun|wire-like rim#Noun|rim of tin left on an edge of the plate#Noun|plate after it is coat#Verb|coated.
  10. (obsolete) A stripe#Noun|stripe.
    • 1646, Thomas Browne, “Of the Same [i.e., the Blacknesse of Negroes]”, in Pseudodoxia Epidemica: Or, Enquiries into Very Many Received Tenents, and Commonly Presumed Truths, London: Printed for Tho. Harper for Edvvard Dod, OCLC 838860010 ↗; Pseudodoxia Epidemica: Or, Enquiries into Very Many Received Tenents, and Commonly Presumed Truths. […], 2nd corrected and much enlarged edition, London: Printed by A. Miller, for Edw[ard] Dod and Nath. Ekins, […], 1650, OCLC 152706203 ↗, book 6, page 282 ↗:
      Thus the Aſſe having a peculiar mark of a croſſe made by a black liſt down his back, and another athwart, or at right angles down his ſhoulders; common opinion aſcribes this figure unto a peculiar ſignation; ſince that beaſt had the honour to bear our Saviour on his back.
  11. (obsolete) A boundary or limit#Noun|limit; a border#Noun|border.
    • c. 1597, [William Shakespeare], The History of Henrie the Fovrth; […], quarto edition, London: Printed by P[eter] S[hort] for Andrew Wise, […], published 1598, OCLC 932916628 ↗, [Act IV, scene i] ↗:
      [W]ere it good / […] to ſet ſo rich a maine / On the nice hazard of one doubtfull houre? / It were not good for therein ſhould we read / The very bottome and the ſoule of hope, / The very liſt, the very vtmost bound / Of all our fortunes.
      Is it good / […] to place so high a stake / On the risky hazard of one doubtful hour? / No, it would be no good for we would read into it that we had reached / The end of our hope, / The very limit, the very utmost boundary / Of all our luck.
Synonyms Translations Translations Translations
Verb

list (lists, present participle listing; past and past participle listed)

  1. (transitive) To create or recite a list.
  2. (transitive) To place#Verb|place in listing#Noun|listings.
  3. (transitive) To sew together, as strip#Noun|strips of cloth, so as to make a show#Noun|show of colours#Noun|colours, or to form#Verb|form a border#Noun|border.
  4. (transitive) To cover#Verb|cover with list, or with strips of cloth; to put list on; to stripe#Verb|stripe as if with list.
    to list a door
    • 1859, Alfred Tennyson, “Vivien”, in Idylls of the King, London: Edward Moxon & Co., […], OCLC 911789798 ↗, page 142 ↗:
      He raised his eyes and saw / The tree that shone white-listed thro' the gloom.
  5. (transitive, agriculture) To plough#Verb|plough and plant#Verb|plant with a lister.
  6. (transitive, agriculture, chiefly, Southern US) To prepare (land#Noun|land) for a cotton crop#Noun|crop by making alternating#Adjective|alternating bed#Noun|beds and alleys with a hoe#Noun|hoe.
  7. (transitive, carpentry) To cut#Verb|cut away a narrow#Adjective|narrow strip, as of sapwood, from the edge#Noun|edge of.
    to list a board
  8. (transitive, military) To enclose (a field#Noun|field, etc.) for combat#Noun|combat.
  9. (transitive, obsolete) To engage a soldier#Noun|soldier, etc.; to enlist.
    • 1822, [Walter Scott], chapter IV, in Peveril of the Peak. [...] In Four Volumes, volume I, Edinburgh: Printed for Archibald Constable and Co.; London: Hurst, Robinson, and Co., OCLC 2392685 ↗, page 107 ↗:
      "I have a gun, madam," said little Julian, "and the park-keeper is to teach me how to fire it next year." / "I will list you for my soldier, then," said the Countess.
  10. (intransitive, obsolete) To engage in public service by enrolling one's name#Noun|name; to enlist.
Synonyms Translations
Noun

list (uncountable)

  1. (archaic) Art; craft#Noun|craft; cunning; skill.
Synonyms
Verb

list (lists, present participle listing; past and past participle list)

  1. (intransitive, poetic) To listen.
    • c. 1606–1607, William Shakespeare, “The Tragedie of Anthonie and Cleopatra”, in Mr. William Shakespeares Comedies, Histories, & Tragedies: Published According to the True Originall Copies (First Folio), London: Printed by Isaac Iaggard, and Ed[ward] Blount, published 1623, OCLC 606515358 ↗, [Act IV, scene iii], page 359 ↗, column 1:
      2 [Soldier] Peace, what noiſe? / 1 [Soldier] Liſt liſt. / 2 Hearke. / 1 Music i' th' Ayre.
  2. (transitive, poetic) To listen to.
    • c. 1599–1602, William Shakespeare, The Tragicall Historie of Hamlet, Prince of Denmarke: […] (Second Quarto), London: Printed by I[ames] R[oberts] for N[icholas] L[ing] […], published 1604, OCLC 760858814 ↗, [Act I, scene iii] ↗:
      Then weigh#English|way what loſſe your honor may ſuſtaine / If with too credent eare you liſt his ſongs / Or looſe your hart, or your chaſt treaſure open / To his unmastered#English|vnmaſtred importunity.

Verb

list (lists, present participle listing; past and past participle listed)

  1. (transitive, archaic) To be pleasing#Adjective|pleasing to.
  2. (transitive, archaic) To desire#Verb|desire, like, or wish#Verb|wish (to do something).
    • 1610–1611, William Shakespeare, “The Tempest”, in Mr. William Shakespeares Comedies, Histories, & Tragedies: Published According to the True Originall Copies (First Folio), London: Printed by Isaac Iaggard, and Ed[ward] Blount, published 1623, OCLC 606515358 ↗, [Act III, scene ii], page 12 ↗, column 2:
      If thou beest#English|beeſt a man, ſhew thy ſelfe in thy likeneſs. If thou beeſt a devil#English|diuell, take't as thou liſt.
    • 1611, The Holy Bible, […] (King James Version), imprinted at London: By Robert Barker, […], OCLC 964384981 ↗, John 3:8 ↗:
      The winde bloweth where it liſteth, and thou heareſt the ſound thereof, but canſt not tel whence it commeth, and whither it goeth: So is euery one that is borne of the Spirit.
    • 1678, John Bunyan, The Pilgrim’s Progress from This World, to That which is to Come: […], London: Printed for Nath[aniel] Ponder […], OCLC 228725984 ↗; reprinted in The Pilgrim’s Progress (The Noel Douglas Replicas), London: Noel Douglas, […], 1928, OCLC 5190338 ↗, page 206 ↗:
      What! would you have us truſt to what Chriſt in his own perſon has done without us! This conceit would looſen the reines of our luſt, and tollerate us to live as we liſt: For what matter how we live, if we may be Juſtified by Chriſts perſonal righteouſneſs from all, when we believe it?
    • 1843 April, Thomas Carlyle, “Unworking Aristocracy”, in Past and Present, London: Chapman and Hall, OCLC 924818948 ↗; republished New York, N.Y.: William H. Colyer, […], May 1843, OCLC 10193956 ↗, book III (The Modern Worker), page 102 ↗:
      Ye are as gods, that can create soil. Soil-creating gods there is no withstanding. They have the might to sell wheat at what price they list; and the right, to all lengths, and famine-lengths,—if they be pitiless infernal gods!
Translations Translations
  • Russian: жела́ть

Noun

list

  1. (obsolete) desire#Noun|Desire, inclination.
    • c. 1603–1604, William Shakespeare, The Tragœdy of Othello, the Moore of Venice. […] (First Quarto), London: Printed by N[icholas] O[kes] for Thomas Walkley, […], published 1622, OCLC 724111485 ↗, [Act II, scene i], page 24 ↗:
      I know too much: / I finde it, I; for when I ha liſt to ſleepe, / marry#Interjection|Mary, before your Ladiſhip I grant, / She puts her tongue alittle in her heart, / And chides with thinking.
      I know, [she talks] too much: / I find that, when I have desire to sleep. / Indeed, before your Ladyship I admit, / She keeps a little quiet, / And scolds me with her thoughts.

Noun

list (plural lists)

  1. (architecture) A tilt#Noun|tilt to a building#Noun|building.
  2. (nautical) A careen#Noun|careening or tilt#Noun|tilting to one side#Noun|side, usually not intentionally or under a vessel's own power#Noun|power. [from early 17th c.]
Translations
Verb

list (lists, present participle listing; past and past participle listed)

  1. (transitive, nautical) To cause (something) to tilt#Verb|tilt to one side#Noun|side. [from early 17th c.]
    the steady wind listed the ship
  2. (intransitive, nautical) To tilt to one side. [from early 17th c.]
    the ship listed to port
Translations Translations
List
Proper noun
  1. Surname



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