log
Pronunciation
  • (RP) IPA: /lɒɡ/
  • (GA) IPA: /lɔɡ/
  • (cot-caught, Canada) IPA: /lɑɡ/
Noun

log (plural logs)

  1. The trunk of a dead tree, cleared of branches.
    They walked across the stream on a fallen log.
  2. Any bulky piece as cut from the above, used as timber, fuel etc.
    • 1995: New American Standard Bible: Matthew 7, 3 – 5 ↗
      Why do you look at the speck that is in your brother's eye, but do not notice the log that is in your own eye? Or how can you say to your brother, "Let me take the speck out of your eye," and behold, the log is in your own eye? You hypocrite, first take the log out of your own eye, and then you will see clearly to take the speck out of your brother's eye.
  3. A unit of length equivalent to 16 feet, used for measuring timber, especially the trunk of a tree.
  4. Anything shaped like a log; a cylinder.
  5. (nautical) A floating device, usually of wood, used in navigation to estimate the speed of a vessel through water.
    • 1659, Navigation by the Mariners Plain Scale New Plain'd, by John Collins
      Every Noon the Master and his Mates take the reckoning off the Log-board, and double the Knots run, and then divide the Product, which is the number of Miles run by three, the quotient is the Leagues run since the former Noon, and according to custom the Log is thrown every two hours, and I never knew the course nearer expressed on the Log-board, then to half a point of the Compass.
  6. (figuratively) A blockhead; a very stupid person.
  7. (surfing slang) A heavy longboard.
    • 1999, Neal Miyake [https://web.archive.org/web/20060530122555/http://www.iav.com/~sponge/sesh/new2/sesh213.htm]
      I know he hadn’t surfed on a log much in his childhood
  8. (figuratively) A rolled cake with filling.
  9. (mining) A weight or block near the free end of a hoisting rope to prevent it from being drawn through the sheave.
  10. (vulgar) A piece of feces.
Translations Translations Translations
  • French: loch
  • German: Log
  • Italian: solcometro
  • Portuguese: barquilha, barquinha
  • Russian: лаг
  • Spanish: registro
Verb

log (logs, present participle logging; past and past participle logged)

  1. (transitive) To cut trees into logs.
  2. (transitive) To cut down (trees).
  3. (intransitive) To cut down trees in an area, harvesting and transporting the logs as wood.
Synonyms
  • s logbook
Related terms Translations Noun

log (plural logs)

  1. A logbook, or journal of a vessel (or aircraft)'s progress
    • 1883, Robert Louis Stevenson, Treasure Island
      The captain sat down to his log, and here is the beginning of the entry:...
  2. A chronological record of actions, performances, computer/network usage, etc.
  3. (computer science) Specifically, an append-only sequence of records written to file.
Verb

log (logs, present participle logging; past and past participle logged)

  1. (transitive) To make, to add an entry (or more) in a log or logbook.
    to log the miles travelled by a ship
  2. (transitive) To travel (a distance) as shown in a logbook
  3. (transitive) To travel at a specified speed, as ascertained by chip log.
Related terms Translations
  • French: inscrire un évènement dans un journal, ajouter un évènement (une ligne, une information) dans un journal (no specific verb)
  • Portuguese: lançar
  • Spanish: registrar
Verb

log (logs, present participle logging; past and past participle logged)

  1. (obsolete) To move to and fro; to rock.
Noun

log (plural logs)

  1. (historical units of measure) A Hebrew unit of liquid volume (about fracliter).
    • Bible (KJV), Leviticus 14:10:
      ...and one log of oil...
    • 1902, Jewish Encyclopedia, s.v. "Weights and Measures": ↗
      In the Hebrew system the log (Lev. xiv. 10) corresponds to the mina. Since the Hellenistic writers equate the log with the Græco-Roman sextarius, whatever these writers say on the relation of the sextarius to other measures applies also to the relation of these measures to the log. The log and the sextarius, however, are not equal in capacity. The sextarius is estimated at .547 liter, while there is no reason to regard the log as larger than the Babylonian mina, especially as other references of the Greek metrologists support the assumption that the log was equal to the mina. The fact that in the Old Testament the log is mentioned only as a fluid measure may be merely accidental, for the dry measures, which are distinguished in all other cases from the liquid measures, also have the log as their unit. The corresponding dry measure may, however, have been known under a different name.
Noun

log (plural logs)

  1. logarithm.
    To multiply two numbers, add their logs.



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