lout
Pronunciation
  • IPA: /laʊt/
  • (Canada) IPA: /lʌʊt/
Noun

lout (plural louts)

  1. A troublemaker, often violent; a rude violent person; a yob.
    • 1906, Stanley J[ohn] Weyman, chapter I, in Chippinge Borough, New York, N.Y.: McClure, Phillips & Co., OCLC 580270828 ↗, page 01 ↗:
      But the lout looked only to his market, and was not easily repulsed. ¶ "He's there, I tell you," he persisted. "And for threepence I'll get you to see him. Come on, your honour! It's many a Westminster election I've seen, and beer running, from Mr. Fox, […] when maybe it's your honour's going to stand! Anyway, it's down with the mongers!"
    Synonyms: Thesaurus:troublemaker
  2. A clownish, awkward fellow; a bumpkin.
    Synonyms: Thesaurus:bumpkin
Translations Translations Translations Verb

lout (louts, present participle louting; past and past participle louted)

  1. (obsolete, transitive) To treat as a lout or fool; to neglect; to disappoint.
Verb

lout (louts, present participle louting; past and past participle louted)

  1. (intransitive, archaic) To bend, bow, stoop.
    • 1590, Edmund Spenser, The Faerie Queene, I.i:
      He faire the knight saluted, louting low, / Who faire him quited, as that courteous was [...].
    • 1885, Sir Richard Burton, The Book of the Thousand Nights and One Night, vol. 1:
      He took the cup in his hand and, louting low, returned his best thanks [...].



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