mew
Pronunciation Noun

mew (plural mews)

  1. (archaic, poetic) A gull, seagull.
    • 1590, Edmund Spenser, The Faerie Qveene. […], London: Printed [by John Wolfe] for VVilliam Ponsonbie, OCLC 960102938 ↗, book II, canto XII:
      A daungerous and detestable place, / To which nor fish nor fowle did once approch, / But yelling Meawes, with Seagulles hoarse and bace {{...}
    • 1954, J. R. R. Tolkien, The Fellowship of the Ring:
      From helm to sea they saw him leap, / As arrow from the string, / And dive into the water deep, / As mew upon the wing.
Translations Noun

mew (plural mews)

  1. (obsolete) A prison, or other place of confinement.
  2. (obsolete) A hiding place; a secret store or den.
    • 1590, Edmund Spenser, The Faerie Qveene. […], London: Printed [by John Wolfe] for VVilliam Ponsonbie, OCLC 960102938 ↗, book II, canto VII:
      Ne toung did tell, ne hand these handled not, / But safe I haue them kept in secret mew, / From heauens sight, and powre of all which them pursew.
  3. (obsolete) A breeding-cage for birds.
  4. (falconry) A cage for hawks, especially while moulting.
    • 1624, Democritus Junior [pseudonym; Robert Burton], The Anatomy of Melancholy: […], 2nd edition, Oxford, Oxfordshire: Printed by John Lichfield and James Short, for Henry Cripps, OCLC 54573970 ↗:
      , vol.I, New York, 2001, p.243:
      A horse in a stable that never travels, a hawk in a mew that seldom flies, are both subject to diseases; which, left unto themselves, are most free from any such encumbrances.
  5. (falconry, in the plural) A building or set of buildings where moulting birds are kept.
Verb

mew (mews, present participle mewing; past and past participle mewed)

  1. (archaic) To shut away, confine, lock up.
    • circa 1592 William Shakespeare, Richard III (play), Act I, Scene 1,
      More pity that the eagle should be mew’d,
      While kites and buzzards prey at liberty.
    • circa 1596 John Donne, “Elegie XX: Loves Warre,” in Charles M. Coffin (ed.), The Complete Poetry and Selected Prose of John Donne, New York: Modern Library, p. 84,
      To mew me in a Ship, is to inthrall
      Mee in a prison, that weare like to fall;
    • 1693, John Dryden (translator), The Satires (Juvenal) of Decimus Junius Juvenalis, London: Jacob Tonson, Satire 1, p. 10,
      […] Nay some have learn’d the trick
      To beg for absent persons; feign them sick,
      Close mew’d in their Sedans, for fear of air:
    • 1928, Virginia Woolf, Orlando: A Biography, Penguin, 1942, Chapter 5, p. 163,
      […] it was all very well for Orlando to mew herself in her house at Blackfriars and pretend that the climate was the same […]
  2. (of a bird) To moult.
    The hawk mewed his feathers.
    • 1700, John Dryden, Fables Ancient and Modern, London: Jacob Tonson, “Cinyras and Myrrha, Out of the Tenth Book of Ovid’s Metamorphoses,” p. 184,
      Nine times the moon had mewed her horns […]
  3. (of a bird, obsolete) To cause to moult.
  4. (of a deer, obsolete) To shed antlers.
Noun

mew (plural mews)

  1. The crying sound of a cat; a meow, especially of a kitten.
  2. The crying sound of a gull.
  3. (obsolete) An exclamation of disapproval; a boo.
Verb

mew (mews, present participle mewing; past and past participle mewed)

  1. (of a cat, especially of a kitten) To meow.
Interjection
  1. A cat's (especially a kitten's) cry.
  2. A gull's cry.
  3. (archaic) An exclamation of disapproval; boo.
Verb

mew (mews, present participle mewing; past and past participle mewed)

  1. (slang, neologism) To flatten the tongue against the roof of the mouth for supposed health benefits.

Mew
Pronunciation Proper noun
  1. Surname
    Darren James Mew



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