mister
Pronunciation
  • enPR: mĭsʹ-tər, IPA: /ˈmɪstəɹ/
  • (British) IPA: [ˈmɪstə(ɹ)]
  • (America) IPA: [ˈmɪstɚ]
Noun

mister (plural misters)

  1. A title conferred on an adult male, usually when the name is unknown. Also used as a term of address, often by a parent to a young child.
    You may sit here, mister.
    • 1855, George Musalas Colvocoresses, Four Years in the Government Exploring Expedition, J. M. Fairchild & co., page 358:
      Fine day to see sights, gentlemen. Well, misters, here's the railing round the ground, and there's the paling round the tomb, eight feet deep, six feet long, and three feet wide.
    • 1908, Jack Brand, By Wild Waves Tossed: An Ocean Love Story, The McClure Company, page 90:
      There's only three misters aboard this ship, or, rather, there's only two.
    • 1996, Spice Girls (band), Wannabe (song) (song)
      God help the mister who comes between me and my sisters.
    • 2013, Asterix and the Picts, page 37
      Asterix: What? And only now you tell us?
      Obelix: I was talking to the future queen, mister Asterix!
      Asterix: And I advise you to change your tone, mister Obelix!
      Obelix: The future queen and I don't need your advice, mister Asterix! Mister Asterix gives too much advice anyway!
Translations Verb

mister (misters, present participle mistering; past and past participle mistered)

  1. (transitive) To address by the title of "mister".
Noun

mister (plural misters)

  1. (obsolete) Someone's business or function; an occupation, employment, trade.
  2. (now rare, dialectal) A kind, type of.
    • 1590, Edmund Spenser, The Faerie Queene, I.ix:
      The Redcrosse knight toward him crossed fast, / To weet, what mister wight was so dismayd […].
  3. (obsolete) Need (of something).
    • 1485, Sir Thomas Malory, [http://quod.lib.umich.edu/c/cme/MaloryWks2/1:9.8?rgn=div2;view=fulltext chapter viij], in Le Morte Darthur, book VII:
      And thenne the grene knyghte kneled doune / and dyd hym homage with his swerd / thenne said the damoisel me repenteth grene knyghte of your dommage / and of youre broders dethe the black knyghte / for of your helpe I had grete myster / For I drede me sore to passe this forest / Nay drede you not sayd the grene knyghte / for ye shal lodge with me this nyghte / and to morne I shalle helpe you thorou this forest
  4. (obsolete) Necessity; the necessary time.
    • 1485, Sir Thomas Malory, [http://quod.lib.umich.edu/c/cme/MaloryWks2/1:3.13?rgn=div2;view=fulltext chapter xv], in Le Morte Darthur, book I:
      It was by Merlyns auyse said the knyghte / As for hym sayd kynge Carados / I wylle encountre with kynge bors / and ye wil rescowe me whan myster is / go on said they al / we wil do all that we may
Verb

mister (misters, present participle mistering; past and past participle mistered)

  1. (obsolete, impersonal) To be necessary; to matter.
    • 1590, Edmund Spenser, The Faerie Queene, III.vii:
      As for my name, it mistreth not to tell; / Call me the Squyre of Dames that me beseemeth well.
Noun

mister (plural misters)

  1. A device that makes or sprays mist.
    Odessa D. uses a mister Sunday to fight the 106-degree heat at a NASCAR race in Fontana, California.

Mister
Pronunciation
  • enPR: mĭsʹ-tər, IPA: /ˈmɪstəɹ/
  • (British) IPA: [ˈmɪstə(ɹ)]
  • (America) IPA: [ˈmɪstɚ]
Noun

mister (plural misters)

  1. ngd General title or respect of an adult male.
    This is Mister Smith, assistant to the President.
  2. ngd Official title of a military man, usually anyone below rank of captain.
  3. ngd Official form of address of a president of a nation.
    Mister President
  4. ngd Formal address to any official of an organization.
    Mister Secretary
    Mister Treasurer
    Mister Attorney
    Mister Justice
  5. ngd A warrant officer or cadet in the United States Military Academy at West Point.
  6. ngd An informal title used before a nickname or other moniker.
    Mister Suave
    Mister Baseball
Synonyms


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