oblige
Pronunciation
  • IPA: /əˈblaɪdʒ/
Verb

oblige (obliges, present participle obliging; past and past participle obliged)

  1. (transitive) To constrain someone by force or by social, moral or legal means.
    I am obliged to report to the police station every week.
    • 1749, [John Cleland], “(Please specify the letter or volume)”, in Memoirs of a Woman of Pleasure [Fanny Hill], London: Printed [by Thomas Parker] for G. Fenton [i.e., Fenton and Ralph Griffiths] […], OCLC 731622352 ↗:
      Tho' he was some time awake before me, yet did he not offer to disturb a repose he had given me so much occasion for; but on my first stirring, which was not till past ten o'clock, I was oblig'd to endure one more trial of his manhood.
  2. (transitive) To do someone a service or favour (hence, originally, creating an obligation).
    He obliged me by not parking his car in the drive.
  3. (intransitive) To be indebted to someone.
    I am obliged to you for your recent help.
  4. (intransitive) To do a service or favour.
    The singer obliged with another song.
Related terms Translations Translations Translations
  • Russian: быть обязанный



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