philosophy
Pronunciation
  • (British) IPA: /fɪˈlɒsəfi/
  • (GA) IPA: /fɪˈlɑsəfi/
Noun

philosophy

  1. (uncountable, originally) The love of wisdom.
  2. (uncountable) An academic discipline that seeks truth through reasoning rather than empiricism.
    Philosophy is often divided into five major branches: logic, metaphysics, epistemology, ethics and aesthetics.
    • 1661, John Fell (bishop), The Life of the most learned, reverend and pious Dr. H. Hammond ↗
      During the whole time of his abode in the university he generally spent thirteen hours of the day in study; by which assiduity besides an exact dispatch of the whole course of philosophy, he read over in a manner all classic authors that are extant […]
  3. (countable) A comprehensive system of belief.
  4. (countable) A view or outlook regarding fundamental principles underlying some domain.
    a philosophy of government;   a philosophy of education
  5. (countable) A general principle (usually moral).
  6. (archaic) A broader branch of (non-applied) science.
  7. A calm and thoughtful demeanor; calmness of temper.
  8. (French printing, dated) Synonym of small pica#English|small pica.
Related terms Translations Translations
  • Portuguese: filosofia
  • Russian: филосо́фия
Translations
  • Portuguese: filosofia
  • Russian: филосо́фия
Translations Verb

philosophy (philosophies, present participle philosophying; past and past participle philosophied)

  1. (now rare) To philosophize.
    • 1603, Michel de Montaigne, chapter 12, in John Florio, transl., The Essayes, […], book II, printed at London: By Val[entine] Simmes for Edward Blount […], OCLC 946730821 ↗:
      Plato hath (in my seeming) loved this manner of Philosophying, Dialogue wise in good earnest, that therby he might more decently place in sundry mouthes the diversity and variation of his owne conceits.



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