pool
Pronunciation
  • (America, Canada) IPA: /pul/
    • IPA: [pʰuɫ], [pʰuəɫ]
  • (British) IPA: /puːl/
Noun

pool (plural pools)

  1. A small and rather deep collection of (usually) fresh water, as one supplied by a spring, or occurring in the course of a stream; a reservoir for water.
    the pools of Solomon
    • 1610–1611, William Shakespeare, “The Tempest”, in Mr. William Shakespeares Comedies, Histories, & Tragedies: Published According to the True Originall Copies (First Folio), London: Printed by Isaac Iaggard, and Ed[ward] Blount, published 1623, OCLC 606515358 ↗, [Act IV, scene i], page 15 ↗, column 2:
      {...}} at laſt I left them / I’th’ filthy mantled poole beyond your Cell, / There dancing vp to th’ chins, that the fowle Lake / Ore-ſtunck their feet.
    • 1625, Francis Bacon, “Of Marriage And Single Life. VIII.”, in The Essayes or Covncils, Civill and Moral, […] Newly Written, London: Printed by Iohn Haviland for Hanna Barret, OCLC 863521290 ↗; newly enlarged edition, London: Printed by Iohn Haviland, […], 1632, OCLC 863527675 ↗, page 37 ↗:
      A Single Life doth well with Church-men : For Charitie will hardly water the Ground, where it muſt firſt fill a Poole.
  2. A small body of standing or stagnant water; a puddle.
  3. Ellipsis of swimming pool#English|swimming pool
  4. A supply of resources.
    There is a limited pool of candidates from which to choose the new manager.
    dating pool
  5. (by extension, computing) A set of resources that are kept ready to use.
  6. A small amount of liquid on a surface.
    a pool of blood
  7. A localized glow of light.
Translations Translations Translations Verb

pool (pools, present participle pooling; past and past participle pooled)

  1. (intransitive, of a liquid) To form a pool.
Noun

pool (plural pools)

  1. (game, uncountable) A game at billiards, in which each of the players stakes a certain sum, the winner taking the whole; also, in public billiard rooms, a game in which the loser pays the entrance fee for all who engage in the game.
  2. (sport) A cue sport played on a pool table. There are 15 balls, 7 of one colour, 7 of another, and the black ball (also called the 8 ball). A player must pocket all their own colour balls and then the black ball in order to win.
    • 1848, William Makepeace Thackeray, The Book of Snobs Chapter 23
      He plays pool at the billiard-houses, and may be seen engaged at cards and dominoes of forenoons.
  3. In rifle shooting, a contest in which each competitor pays a certain sum for every shot he makes, the net proceeds being divided among the winners.
  4. Any gambling or commercial venture in which several persons join.
  5. The stake played for in certain games of cards, billiards, etc.; an aggregated stake to which each player has contributed a share; also, the receptacle for the stakes.
  6. A combination of persons contributing money to be used for the purpose of increasing or depressing the market price of stocks, grain, or other commodities; also, the aggregate of the sums so contributed.
    The pool took all the wheat offered below the limit.
    He put $10,000 into the pool.
  7. A set of players in quadrille etc.
  8. (rail transport) A mutual arrangement between competing lines, by which the receipts of all are aggregated, and then distributed pro rata according to agreement.
  9. (legal) An aggregation of properties or rights, belonging to different people in a community, in a common fund, to be charged with common liabilities.
Translations Verb

pool (pools, present participle pooling; past and past participle pooled)

  1. (transitive) To put together; contribute to a common fund, on the basis of a mutual division of profits or losses; to make a common interest of.
    We must pool our resources.
    • 1920, Frank L. Packard, The White Moll Chapter 4
      “She must be exceedingly clever to have beaten the police the way she has for the last few years; and—er—I worship at the shrine of cleverness—especially if it be a woman’s. The idea struck me last night that if she and I should—er—pool our resources, we should not have to complain of the reward.”
      “Oh, so youse wants to work wid her, eh?” sniffed Rhoda Gray. “So dat’s it, is it?”
    • 27 February 2010, Barack Obama, Presidential Weekly Address - Time for Us to Act
      Many on both sides agreed that we should give small businesses and individuals the ability to participate in a new insurance marketplace – which members of Congress would also use – that would allow them to pool their purchasing power and get a better deal from insurance companies.
  2. (intransitive) To combine or contribute with others, as for a commercial, speculative, or gambling transaction.
Translations Translations


This text is extracted from the Wiktionary and it is available under the CC BY-SA 3.0 license | Terms and conditions | Privacy policy 0.011
Offline English dictionary