preach
Pronunciation
  • IPA: /pɹiːt͡ʃ/
Verb

preach (preaches, present participle preaching; past preached, past participle preached)

  1. (intransitive) To give a sermon.
    A learned local Muslim used to preach in the small mosque every Friday.
  2. (transitive) To proclaim by public discourse; to utter in a sermon or a formal religious harangue.
    • Bible, Isa. lxi. 1
      The Lord hath anointed me to preach good tidings unto the meek.
  3. (transitive) To advise or recommend earnestly.
    • c. 1594, William Shakespeare, “The Comedie of Errors”, in Mr. William Shakespeares Comedies, Histories, & Tragedies: Published According to the True Originall Copies (First Folio), London: Printed by Isaac Iaggard, and Ed[ward] Blount, published 1623, OCLC 606515358 ↗, [Act V, scene i]:
      My master preaches patience to him.
  4. (transitive) To teach or instruct by preaching; to inform by preaching.
    • The Spirits of the Dead, / Quitting their mortal mansion, enter not, / As ye are preached, their final seat / Of bliss, or bale.
  5. (intransitive) To give advice in an offensive or obtrusive manner.
Related terms Translations Translations Translations Noun

preach (plural preaches)

  1. (obsolete) A religious discourse.



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