precedent
Pronunciation

Adjective:

  • IPA: /pɹɪˈsiː.dənt/

    Noun:

  • (GA, RP) enPR: prĕsʹĭ-dənt, IPA: /ˈpɹɛs.ɪ.dənt/
  • (Aus, New Zealand) IPA: /ˈpɹes.ə.dənt/, /ˈpɹiː.sə.dənt/
Noun

precedent (plural precedents)

  1. An act in the past which may be used as an example to help decide the outcome of similar instances in the future.
    • Examples for cases can but direct as precedents only.
  2. (legal) A decided case which is cited or used as an example to justify a judgment in a subsequent case.
  3. An established habit or custom.
  4. (obsolete, with definite article) The aforementioned (thing).
    • 1624, Democritus Junior [pseudonym; Robert Burton], The Anatomy of Melancholy: […], 2nd edition, Oxford, Oxfordshire: Printed by John Lichfield and James Short, for Henry Cripps, OCLC 54573970 ↗:
      , New York 2001, p.74:
      A third argument may be derived from the precedent.
  5. The previous version.
  6. (obsolete) A rough draught of a writing which precedes a finished copy.
Translations Translations Adjective

precedent (not comparable)

  1. Happening or taking place earlier in time; previous or preceding. [from 14th c.]
  2. (now rare) Coming before in a particular order or arrangement; preceding, foregoing. [from 15th c.]
    • 1624, Democritus Junior [pseudonym; Robert Burton], The Anatomy of Melancholy: […], 2nd edition, Oxford, Oxfordshire: Printed by John Lichfield and James Short, for Henry Cripps, OCLC 54573970 ↗, partition III, section 2, member 1, subsection i:
      In the precedent section mention was made, amongst other pleasant objects, of this comeliness and beauty which proceeds from women […].
Translations Verb

precedent (precedents, present participle precedenting; past and past participle precedented)

  1. (transitive, legal) To provide precedents for.
  2. (transitive, legal) To be a precedent for.



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