quadrate
Adjective

quadrate

  1. Having four equal sides, the opposite sides parallel, and four right angles; square.
    • Figures, some round, some triangle, some quadrate.
  2. Produced by multiplying a number by itself; square.
    • 1646-72, Sir Thomas Browne, Pseudodoxia Epidemica, book 4, ch. 12:
      The number of Ten hath been as highly extolled, as containing even, odd, long, plain, quadrate and cubical numbers.
  3. (archaic) Square; even; balanced; equal; exact.
    • a quadrate, solid, wise man
  4. (archaic) Squared; suited; correspondent.
    • a generical description quadrate to both
Noun

quadrate (plural quadrates)

  1. (geometry) A plane surface with four equal sides and four right angles; a square; hence, figuratively, anything having the outline of a square.
    • 1667, John Milton, Paradise Lost, Book VI:
      At which command, the powers militant
      That stood for heaven, in mighty quadrate joined.
  2. (astrology) An aspect of the heavenly bodies in which they are distant from each other 90°, or the quarter of a circle; quartile.
  3. (anatomy) The quadrate bone.
Verb

quadrate (quadrates, present participle quadrating; past and past participle quadrated)

  1. (archaic, transitive) To adjust (a gun) on its carriage.
  2. (archaic, transitive) To train (a gun) for horizontal firing.
  3. (archaic, ambitransitive) To square.
    quadrating the circle
  4. (archaic, transitive) To square; to agree; to suit; to correspond (with).
    not quadrating with American ideas of right, justice and reason
    • The objections of these speculatists, if its forces do not quadrate with their theories, are as valid against such an old and beneficent government as against the most violent tyranny or the greenest usurpation.
    • 1749, Henry Fielding, The History of Tom Jones, a Foundling. In Six Volumes, volume (please specify ), London: Printed by A[ndrew] Millar, […], OCLC 928184292 ↗:
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      In short I am resolved, from this instance, never to give way to the weakness of human nature more, nor to think anything virtue which doth not exactly quadrate with the unerring rule of right.



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