quarry
Pronunciation
  • (RP) IPA: /ˈkwɒɹi/
  • (GA) IPA: /ˈkwɔɹi/
Noun

quarry (plural quarries)

  1. (mining) A site#Noun|site for mine#Verb|mining stone#Noun|stone, limestone, or slate#Noun|slate.
    Michelangelo personally quarried marble from the world-famous quarry at Carrara.
    • 1644, John Milton, Areopagitica; a Speech of Mr. John Milton for the Liberty of Vnlicenc’d Printing, to the Parlament of England, London: [s.n.], OCLC 879551664 ↗, page 32 ↗:
      Yet theſe are the men cry'd out againſt for ſchiſmaticks and ſectaries; as if, while the Temple of the Lord was building, ſome cutting, ſome ſquaring the marble, others hewing the cedars, there ſhould be a ſort of irrationall men who could not conſider there muſt be many ſchiſms and many diſſections made in the quarry and the timber, ere the houſe of God can be built.
    • 1945 August 17, George Orwell [pseudonym; Eric Arthur Blair], chapter 6, in Animal Farm: A Fairy Story, London: Secker & Warburg, OCLC 3655473 ↗:
      There was a good quarry of limestone on the farm {{...}
Synonyms Translations Verb

quarry (quarries, present participle quarrying; past and past participle quarried)

  1. (transitive) To obtain (or mine#Verb|mine) stone by extraction from a quarry.
  2. (figuratively, transitive) To extract#Verb|extract or slowly obtain by long, tedious searching#Noun|searching.
    They quarried out new, interesting facts about ancient Egypt from old papyri.
Synonyms Translations Noun

quarry

  1. (uncountable, obsolete) A part of the entrails of a hunted#Adjective|hunted animal, given to the hound#Noun|hounds as a reward#Noun|reward.
    • 1728, E[phraim] Chambers, “Quarry”, in Cyclopædia: Or, An Universal Dictionary of Arts and Sciences; […] In Two Volumes, volume II (I–Z), London: Printed for James and John Knapton [et al.], OCLC 49347394 ↗, page 936 ↗, column 2:
      '''{{smallcaps
  2. (uncountable) An animal, often a bird or mammal, which is hunt#Verb|hunted.
    • 1692, Roger L’Estrange, “[A Supplement of Fables, out of Phædrus, Avienus, Camerarius, Neveletus, Apthethonius, Gabrias, Babrias, Abstemius, Alciatus, Boccalini, Baudoin, De la Fontaine, Æsope en Belle Humeur, Meslier, &c.] Fab[le] CCCCLXX. A Farmer and His Servant.”, in Fables, of Æsop and Other Eminent Mythologists: […], London: Printed for R[ichard] Sare, […], OCLC 228727523 ↗, page 445 ↗:
      Is it not our very Caſe now, that when our Souls, Good-Names, Bodies and Fortunes are at Stake, we muſt be running out at Check, after every Crow, Buzzard, or Jack-daw that comes in the way, and leave the main Chance at laſt at Six and Seven? Nay, and here's this more in't too, that the Quarry would not be worth the taking up neither, if we could Catch it; beſide, that it flies away ſtill before us, and is never to be Overtaken.
  3. (countable) An object of search#Noun|search or pursuit.
    • 1593, Tho[mas] Nashe, “The Foure Letters Confuted”, in The Apologie of Pierce Pennilesse. Or, Strange Newes, of the Intercepting Certaine Letters: […], Printed at London: By Iohn Danter, […], OCLC 222196160 ↗; republished as John Payne Collier, editor, Strange Newes, of the Intercepting Certaine Letters […] (Miscellaneous Tracts; Temp. Eliz. and Jac. I), [London: s.n., 1870], OCLC 906587369 ↗, page 73 ↗:
      In a verſe, when a worde of three ſillables cannot thruſt in but ſidelings, to joynt him even, we are oftentimes faine to borrowe ſome leſſer quarry of elocution from the Latine, alwaies retaining this for a principle, that a leake of indeſinence , as a leake in a ſhip, muſt needly be ſtopt with what matter ſoever.
    • 1596, Edmund Spenser, The Faerie Qveene. […], part II (books IV–VI), London: Printed [by Richard Field] for VVilliam Ponsonbie, OCLC 932900760 ↗, book VI, canto II, stanza 20, page 375 ↗:
      Meanwhile his Ladie, which this outrage ſaw, / Whileſt they together for the quarrey ſtroue, / Into the couert did her ſelfe withdrw, / And cloſely hid her ſelfe within the groue.
Synonyms Translations Translations
  • Italian: preda
  • Russian: добыча
Verb

quarry (quarries, present participle quarrying; past and past participle quarried)

  1. To secure prey#Noun|prey; to prey, as a vulture or harpy.
    • 1692, Roger L’Estrange, “[The Fables of Æsop, &c.] Fab[le] VI. A Dog and a Shadow.”, in Fables, of Æsop and Other Eminent Mythologists: […], London: Printed for R[ichard] Sare, […], OCLC 228727523 ↗, page 6 ↗:
      What's an Eternal Circulation of the ſame Things, as well as the ſame Steps, without Advancing one Inch of Ground towards his Journey's End, but Ixion in the Wheel? And all this while, with Cares, and Horrors at his Heart, like the Vultur that's Day and Night Quarrying upon Prometheus's Liver.
Noun

quarry (plural quarries)

  1. A diamond-shaped tile#Noun|tile or pane, often of glass or stone#Noun|stone.



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