question
Pronunciation
  • IPA: /ˈkwɛst͡ʃən/, /ˈkwɛstjən/, /ˈkwɛʃt͡ʃən/
  • (US also) IPA: /ˈkwɛʃtən/
Noun

question (plural questions)

  1. A sentence, phrase or word which asks for information, reply or response; an interrogative.
    What is your question?
  2. A subject or topic for consideration or investigation.
    The question of seniority will be discussed at the meeting.
    There was a question of which material to use.
  3. A doubt or challenge about the truth or accuracy of a matter.
    His claim to the property has come under question.
    The story is true beyond question.
    He obeyed without question.
    • 1611, The Holy Bible, […] (King James Version), imprinted at London: By Robert Barker, […], OCLC 964384981 ↗, John 3:25 ↗:
      There arose a question between some of John's disciples and the Jews about purifying.
    • 1623, Francis Bacon, An Advertisement touching an Holy War
      It is to be to question, whether it be lawful for Christian princes or states to make an invasive war, only and simply for the propagation of the faith.
  4. A proposal to a meeting as a topic for deliberation.
    I move that the question be put to a vote.
  5. Interrogation by torture.
    • 18, Thomas Babington Macaulay, chapter 2, in The History of England from the Accession of James the Second, volume (please specify ), London: Longman, Brown, Green, and Longmans, OCLC 1069526323 ↗:
  6. (obsolete) Talk; conversation; speech.
    • c. 1603–1606, William Shakespeare, “The Tragedie of King Lear”, in Mr. William Shakespeares Comedies, Histories, & Tragedies: Published According to the True Originall Copies (First Folio), London: Printed by Isaac Iaggard, and Ed[ward] Blount, published 1623, OCLC 606515358 ↗, [Act IV, scene iii]:
      Made she no verbal question?
Synonyms Related terms Translations Translations Translations Translations Verb

question (questions, present participle questioning; past and past participle questioned)

  1. (transitive) To ask questions about; to interrogate; to enquire for information.
    • 1597, Francis Bacon, Of Discourse
      He that questioneth much shall learn much.
  2. (transitive) To raise doubt about; have doubts about.
    • 2019, [https://web.archive.org/web/20190311070055/https://learningenglish.voanews.com/a/south-korea-proposes-rain-project-with-china-to-cut-pollution/4819207.html VOA Learning English] (public domain)
      He questioned South Korean claims that China is a major source of its pollution.
  3. (intransitive, obsolete) To argue; to converse; to dispute.
    • c. 1596–1598, William Shakespeare, “The Merchant of Venice”, in Mr. William Shakespeares Comedies, Histories, & Tragedies: Published According to the True Originall Copies (First Folio), London: Printed by Isaac Iaggard, and Ed[ward] Blount, published 1623, OCLC 606515358 ↗, [Act IV, scene i]:
      I pray you, think you question with the Jew.
Synonyms Translations Translations


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