recover
Pronunciation
  • (RP) IPA: /ɹɪˈkʌvə/
  • (GA) IPA: /ɹɪˈkʌvɚ/
Verb

recover (recovers, present participle recovering; past and past participle recovered)

  1. (transitive) To get back, regain (a physical thing lost etc.).
    After days of inquiries, he finally recovered his lost wallet.
    • Bible, 1 Samuel 30:18
      David recovered all that the Amalekites had carried away.
  2. (transitive) To return to, resume (a given state of mind or body).
    At the top of the hill I asked to stop for a few minutes to recover my strength.
  3. (transitive, obsolete) To reach (a place), arrive at.
    • With much ado the Christians recovered to Antioch.
    • c. 1590–1591, William Shakespeare, “The Two Gentlemen of Verona”, in Mr. William Shakespeares Comedies, Histories, & Tragedies: Published According to the True Originall Copies (First Folio), London: Printed by Isaac Iaggard, and Ed[ward] Blount, published 1623, OCLC 606515358 ↗, [Act V, scene i]:
      The forest is not three leagues off; / If we recover that, we're sure enough.
    • Except he could recover one of the Cities of Refuge he was to die.
  4. (transitive, archaic) To restore to good health, consciousness, life etc.
    • 1610–1611, William Shakespeare, “The Tempest”, in Mr. William Shakespeares Comedies, Histories, & Tragedies: Published According to the True Originall Copies (First Folio), London: Printed by Isaac Iaggard, and Ed[ward] Blount, published 1623, OCLC 606515358 ↗, [Act II, scene ii]:
      The wine in my bottle will recover him.
    • 1624, Democritus Junior [pseudonym; Robert Burton], The Anatomy of Melancholy: […], 2nd edition, Oxford, Oxfordshire: Printed by John Lichfield and James Short, for Henry Cripps, OCLC 54573970 ↗:
      , vol.I, New York, 2001, p.233-4:
      Cnelius a physician […] gave him a clyster, by which he was speedily recovered.
    • Bible, 2 Timothy 2:26
      that they may recover themselves out of the snare of the devil, who are taken captive by him
  5. (transitive, archaic) To make good by reparation; to make up for; to retrieve; to repair the loss or injury of.
    to recover lost time
    • Even good men have many failings and lapses to lament and recover.
  6. (transitive, archaic) To get better from; to get over.
    To the end of his days, he never fully recovered his daughter's death.
    • I do hope to recover my late hurt.
    • when I had recovered a little my first surprise
  7. (intransitive) To get better, regain one's health.
    I was hurt, but I knew I'd recover, given time.
  8. (intransitive) To regain one's composure, balance etc.
    Spinning round, he caught a stone with his ankle, but recovered quickly before turning to face me.
  9. (intransitive, legal) To obtain a judgement; to succeed in a lawsuit.
    The plaintiff has recovered in his suit.
  10. (transitive, legal) To gain as compensation or reparation.
    to recover damages in trespass; to recover debt and costs in a suit at law
    to recover lands in ejectment or common recovery
  11. (transitive, legal) To gain by legal process.
    to recover judgement against a defendant
Related terms Translations Translations Noun

recover (plural recovers)

  1. (obsolete) Recovery. [14th-17thc.]
    • 1485, Sir Thomas Malory, [http://quod.lib.umich.edu/c/cme/MaloryWks2/1:22.14?rgn=div2;view=fulltext chapter xiiij], in Le Morte Darthur, book XX:
      It was neuer in my thoughte saide laūcelot to withholde the quene from my lord Arthur / but in soo moche she shold haue ben dede for my sake / me semeth it was my parte to saue her lyf and putte her from that daunger tyl better recouer myghte come / & now I thanke god sayd sir Launcelot that the pope hath made her pees
  2. (military) A position of holding a firearm during exercises, whereby the lock is at shoulder height and the sling facing out.
  3. (rowing) The forward movement in rowing, after one stroke to take another.
Pronunciation
  • (RP) IPA: /ɹiːˈkʌvə/
  • (America) IPA: /ɹiˈkʌvɚ/
Verb

recover (recovers, present participle recovering; past and past participle recovered)

  1. To cover again.
  2. (roofing) To add a new roof membrane or steep-slope covering over an existing one.



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