regard
Pronunciation
  • (RP) IPA: /ɹɪˈɡɑːd/
  • (America) IPA: /ɹɪˈɡɑɹd/
Noun

regard

  1. (countable) A steady look, a gaze. [from 15th c.]
    • 1982, Lawrence Durrell, Constance, Faber & Faber 2004 (Avignon Quintet), p. 750:
      He bathed in the memory of her blondness, of her warm blue regard, and the sentiment permeated his sensibility with tenderness made the more rich because its object was someone long since dead.
  2. One's concern for another; esteem; relation, reference. [from 16th c.]
  3. (preceded by “in” or “with”) A particular aspect or detail; respect, sense. [from 16th c.]
    • 1842, Treuttel and Würtz, The Foreign Quarterly Review, page 144:
      This attempt will be made with every regard to the difficulty of the undertaking […]
    • 1989, Leonard W. Poon, David C. Rubin, Barbara A. Wilson, Everyday Cognition in Adulthood and Late Life, Cambridge University Press, page 399:
      These problems were not traditional problems with realistic stimuli, but rather were realistic in every regard.
  4. (uncountable) The worth or estimation in which something or someone is held.
    Synonyms: esteem, repute
    He is held in great regard in Whitehall.
Synonyms Antonyms Translations Translations Translations Verb

regard (regards, present participle regarding; past and past participle regarded)

  1. To look at; to observe. [from 16th c.]
    She regarded us warily.
  2. (transitive) To consider, look upon (something) in a given way etc. [from 16th c.]
    I always regarded tabloid journalism as a social evil.
    He regards honesty as a duty.
    • 1598–1599 (first performance), William Shakespeare, “Much Adoe about Nothing”, in Mr. William Shakespeares Comedies, Histories, & Tragedies: Published According to the True Originall Copies (First Folio), London: Printed by Isaac Iaggard, and Ed[ward] Blount, published 1623, OCLC 606515358 ↗, (please specify the act number in uppercase Roman numerals):
      , [Act V, scene iv]:
      Signior Leonato, truth it is good Signior, / Your neece regards me with an eye of fauour.
  3. (transitive, archaic) To take notice of, pay attention to. [from 16th c.]
    • c. 1606, William Shakespeare, “The Tragedie of Macbeth”, in Mr. William Shakespeares Comedies, Histories, & Tragedies: Published According to the True Originall Copies (First Folio), London: Printed by Isaac Iaggard, and Ed[ward] Blount, published 1623, OCLC 606515358 ↗, [Act III, scene iv], page 142 ↗, column 1:
      If much you note#English|note him / You ſhall offend him, and extend his passion#English|Paſſion, / Feed, and regard him not.
  4. (transitive) To face toward.
  5. (transitive) To have to do with, to concern. [from 17th c.]
    That argument does not regard the question.
  6. (transitive, obsolete) To set store by (something), to hold (someone) in esteem; to consider to have value, to respect. [from 16th c.]
    • 1526, William Tyndale, trans. Bible, Luke 18:2 ↗:
      Ther was a Iudge in a certayne cite which feared not god nether regarded man.
Synonyms
  • (to look at) seeSynonyms en
  • (to consider) seeSynonyms en
  • (to take notice of) seeSynonyms en
Antonyms Translations Translations Translations Translations Translations


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