residence
Pronunciation
  • IPA: /ˈɹɛz.ɪ.dəns/

Noun

residence

  1. The place where one lives; one's home.
    • 1881, Thomas Babington Macaulay, “[https://en.wikisource.org/wiki/Encyclop%C3%A6dia_Britannica,_Ninth_Edition/Johnson,_Samuel Samuel Johnson]”, in Encyclopædia Britannica, Ninth Edition:
      Johnson took up his residence in London.
  2. A building used as a home.
  3. The place where a corporation is established.
  4. The state of living in a particular place or environment.
    • 1713, The History of the Common Law of England, Sir Matthew Hale (jurist), Google Books, page 87 ↗
      The confessor had often made considerable residences in Normandy.
  5. Accommodation for students at a university or college.
  6. The place where anything rests permanently.
    • 1649, [John] Milton, [Eikonoklastes]  […], London: Printed by Matthew Simmons,  […], OCLC 1044608640 ↗:
      But when a king sets himself to bandy against the highest court and residence of all his regal power, he then […] fights against his own majesty and kingship.
  7. subsidence, as of a sediment
  8. That which falls to the bottom of liquors; sediment; also, refuse; residuum.
Related terms Translations Translations Translations Translations


This text is extracted from the Wiktionary and it is available under the CC BY-SA 3.0 license | Terms and conditions | Privacy policy 0.006
Offline English dictionary