resign
Pronunciation
  • (British) IPA: /ɹɪˈzaɪn/
Verb

resign (resigns, present participle resigning; past and past participle resigned)

  1. (transitive) To give up; to relinquish ownership of. [from 14th c.]
    • 1603, Michel de Montaigne, chapter 39, in John Florio, transl., The Essayes, […], book I, printed at London: By Val[entine] Simmes for Edward Blount […], OCLC 946730821 ↗:
      And if the perfection of well-speaking might bring any glorie sutable unto a great personage, Scipio and Lelius would never have resigned the honour of their Comedies […] unto an Affrican servant […].
  2. (transitive) To hand over (something to someone), place into the care or control of another.
  3. (transitive or intransitive) To quit (a job or position). [from 14th c.]
    I am resigning in protest of the unfair treatment of our employees.
    He resigned the crown to follow his heart.
  4. (transitive or intransitive) To submit passively; to give up as hopeless or inevitable. [from 15th c.]
    After fighting for so long, she finally resigned to her death.
    He had no choice but to resign the game and let his opponent become the champion.
    • 1996, Robin Buss, The Count of Monte Cristo, translation of, Alexandre Dumas, Le Comte de Monte-Cristo, 2003 Penguin edition, ISBN 0140449264, page 394 :
      Here is a man who was resigned to his fate, who was walking to the scaffold and about to die like a coward, that's true, but at least he was about to die without resisting and without recrimination. Do you know what gave him that much strength? Do you know what consoled him? Do you know what resigned him to his fate?
Synonyms Translations Translations Translations Pronunciation
  • IPA: /ɹiːˈsaɪn/
Verb

resign (resigns, present participle resigning; past and past participle resigned)

  1. (proscribed) Alternative spelling of re-sign



This text is extracted from the Wiktionary and it is available under the CC BY-SA 3.0 license | Terms and conditions | Privacy policy 0.017
Offline English dictionary