resound
Pronunciation
  • IPA: /ˌɹiːˈsaʊnd/

Verb

resound (resounds, present participle resounding; past and past participle resounded)

  1. (ambitransitive) To echo (a sound) or again sound.
    • 1992, Health Devices, volume 21, page 117:
      Any new alarms, from any patient, will resound the alarm tone.
Translations
Noun

resound (plural resounds)

  1. An echoing or reverberating sound.
    • 1932, Grantland Rice, ‎Harford Powel, The Omnibus of Sport (page 370)
      Presently, out of the turmoil, the fighting of horses, the resound of blows, the murky cloud of dust and sand, he crawled, in time to see the Corinthian and Byzantine go on down the course after Ben-Hur, who had not been an instant delayed.
Pronunciation
  • IPA: /ɹɨˈzaʊnd/

Verb

resound (resounds, present participle resounding; past and past participle resounded)

  1. (intransitive) To reverberate with sound or noise.
    The street resounded with the noise of the children's game.
  2. (intransitive) To make a reverberating sound.
    The sound of the brass band resounded through the town.
  3. (intransitive) To be much mentioned.
  4. (transitive) To throw back, or return, the sound of; to echo.
    • 1709, Alexander Pope, Pastorals, Spring:
      Albion's cliffs resound the rural lay.
  5. (transitive) To praise or celebrate with the voice, or the sound of instruments; to extol with sounds; to spread the fame of.
    • 1725, Homer; [Elijah Fenton], transl., “Book I”, in The Odyssey of Homer. […], volume I, London: Printed for Bernard Lintot, OCLC 8736646 ↗:
      The man for wisdom's various arts renown'd, / Long exercised in woes, O Muse, resound.
Translations Translations


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