rub
Pronunciation
  • (British) IPA: /ɹʌb/, [ɹɐb], enPR: rŭb
  • (America) IPA: /ɹʌb/, enPR: rŭb
Noun

rub (plural rubs)

  1. An act of rubbing.
    Give that lamp a good rub and see if any genies come out
  2. A difficulty or problem.
    • c. 1599–1602, William Shakespeare, “The Tragedie of Hamlet, Prince of Denmarke”, in Mr. William Shakespeares Comedies, Histories, & Tragedies: Published According to the True Originall Copies (First Folio), London: Printed by Isaac Iaggard, and Ed[ward] Blount, published 1623, OCLC 606515358 ↗, [Act III, scene i]:
      To die, to sleep—/To sleep—perchance to dream. Ay, there's the rub!/For in that sleep of death what dreams may come,/When we have shuffled off this mortal coil,/Must give us pause
    • 1922 February, James Joyce, “[[Episode 16]]”, in Ulysses, Paris: Shakespeare & Co.; Sylvia Beach, OCLC 560090630 ↗; republished London: Published for the Egoist Press, London by John Rodker, Paris, October 1922, OCLC 2297483 ↗:
      {...}} the propriety of the cabman's shelter, as it was called, hardly a stonesthrow away near Butt bridge where they might hit upon some drinkables in the shape of a milk and soda or a mineral. But how to get there was the rub.
  3. (archaic) A quip or sarcastic remark.
  4. In the game of crown green bowls, any obstacle by which a bowl is diverted from its normal course.
  5. Any substance designed to be applied by rubbing.
    a heat rub intended for muscular strains
    1. A mixture of spices applied to meat before it is barbecued.
Synonyms Translations Translations Verb

rub (rubs, present participle rubbing; past and past participle rubbed)

  1. (transitive) To move (one object) while maintaining contact with another object over some area, with pressure and friction.
    I rubbed the cloth over the glass.
    The cat rubbed itself against my leg.
    I rubbed my hands together for warmth.
  2. (transitive) To rub something against (a second thing).
    I rubbed the glass with the cloth.
    • It shall be expedient, after that body is cleaned, to rub the body with a coarse linen cloth.
  3. (intransitive) To be rubbed against something.
    My shoes are beginning to rub.
  4. (transitive) To spread a substance thinly over; to smear.
    meat rubbed with spices before barbecuing
    • 1667, John Milton, “Book 1”, in Paradise Lost. A Poem Written in Ten Books, London: Printed [by Samuel Simmons], and are to be sold by Peter Parker […] [a]nd by Robert Boulter […] [a]nd Matthias Walker, […], OCLC 228722708 ↗; republished as Paradise Lost in Ten Books: The Text Exactly Reproduced from the First Edition of 1667: […], London: Basil Montagu Pickering […], 1873, OCLC 230729554 ↗:
      The smoothed plank, […] / New rubbed with balm.
  5. (dated) To move or pass with difficulty.
    to rub through woods, as huntsmen
  6. To scour; to burnish; to polish; to brighten; to cleanse; often with up or over.
    to rub up silver
    • The whole business of our redemption is to rub over the defaced copy of the creation.
  7. To hinder; to cross; to thwart.
    • c. 1603–1606, William Shakespeare, “The Tragedie of King Lear”, in Mr. William Shakespeares Comedies, Histories, & Tragedies: Published According to the True Originall Copies (First Folio), London: Printed by Isaac Iaggard, and Ed[ward] Blount, published 1623, OCLC 606515358 ↗, [Act 2, scene ii]:
      'Tis the duke's pleasure, / Whose disposition, all the world well knows, / Will not be rubbed nor stopped.
  8. (transitive, bowls) To touch the jack with the bowl.
Translations Translations Translations
  • German: sich abreiben, sich abscheuern, sich ablaufen
  • Portuguese: raspado
Translations Translations
RUB
Noun

rub (plural rubs)

  1. (protein) Any of a group of proteins similar to ubiquitin
  2. Initialism of rich urban biker



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