sail
Pronunciation
  • IPA: /seɪl/, [seɪ̯ɫ]
Noun

sail

  1. (nautical) A piece of fabric attached to a boat and arranged such that it causes the wind to drive the boat along. The sail may be attached to the boat via a combination of mast, spars and ropes.
    • c. 1595–1596, William Shakespeare, “A Midsommer Nights Dreame”, in Mr. William Shakespeares Comedies, Histories, & Tragedies: Published According to the True Originall Copies (First Folio), London: Printed by Isaac Iaggard, and Ed[ward] Blount, published 1623, OCLC 606515358 ↗, [Act II, scene i] ↗:
      When we haue laughed#English|laught to ſee the ſailes conceiue / And grow big bellied with the wanton winde; {{...}
  2. (nautical,uncountable) The concept of a sail or sails, as if a substance.
    Take in sail: a storm is coming.
  3. (uncountable) The power harnessed by a sail or sails, or the use of this power for travel or transport.
  4. A trip in a boat, especially a sailboat.
    Let's go for a sail.
  5. (dated, plural "sail") A sailing vessel; a vessel of any kind; a craft.
    Twenty sail were in sight.
  6. The blade of a windmill.
  7. A tower-like structure found on the dorsal (topside) surface of submarines.
  8. The floating organ of siphonophores, such as the Portuguese man-of-war.
  9. (fishing) A sailfish.
    We caught three sails today.
  10. (paleontology) an outward projection of the spine, occurring in certain dinosaur and synapsid
  11. Anything resembling a sail, such as a wing.
    • Like an eagle soaring / To weather his broad sails.
Translations Translations Translations
  • French: balade en mer, balade en voilier
  • German: Törn
  • Portuguese: velejada
Translations Translations Translations Verb

sail (sails, present participle sailing; past and past participle sailed)

  1. To be impelled or driven forward by the action of wind upon sails, as a ship on water; to be impelled on a body of water by steam or other power.
  2. To move through or on the water; to swim, as a fish or a waterfowl.
  3. To ride in a boat, especially a sailboat.
  4. (intransitive) To set sail; to begin a voyage.
    We sail for Australia tomorrow.
  5. To move briskly and gracefully through the air.
    • c. 1591–1595, William Shakespeare, “The Tragedie of Romeo and Ivliet”, in Mr. William Shakespeares Comedies, Histories, & Tragedies: Published According to the True Originall Copies (First Folio), London: Printed by Isaac Iaggard, and Ed[ward] Blount, published 1623, OCLC 606515358 ↗, [Act II, scene ii]:
      As is a winged messenger of heaven, […] / When he bestrides the lazy pacing clouds, / And sails upon the bosom of the air.
    • 2002 March 20, Kazuki Takahashi, Yu-Gi-Oh! Forbidden Memories (PlayStation video game, North American version), Konami:
      [flavor text of the card "Spirit of the Winds"]
      A spirit of the wind that freely sails the skies.
  6. (intransitive) To move briskly.
    The duchess sailed haughtily out of the room.
Translations Translations Translations
SAIL
Noun

sail (plural sails)

  1. Acronym of snow avalanche impact landform



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