salary
Pronunciation
  • IPA: /ˈsælɚi/
Noun

salary (plural salaries)

  1. A fixed amount of money paid to a worker, usually calculated on a monthly or annual basis, not hourly, as wages. Implies a degree of professionalism and/or autonomy.
    • c. 1599–1602, William Shakespeare, “The Tragedie of Hamlet, Prince of Denmarke”, in Mr. William Shakespeares Comedies, Histories, & Tragedies: Published According to the True Originall Copies (First Folio), London: Printed by Isaac Iaggard, and Ed[ward] Blount, published 1623, OCLC 606515358 ↗, [Act III, scene iii]:
      This is hire and salary, not revenge.
    • 1668 July 3rd, James Dalrymple, “Thomas Rue contra Andrew Houſtoun” in The Deciſions of the Lords of Council & Seſſion I (Edinburgh, 1683), page 547 ↗
      Andrew Houſtoun and Adam Muſhet, being Tackſmen of the Excize, did Imploy Thomas Rue to be their Collector, and gave him a Sallary of 30. pound Sterling for a year.
Translations Verb

salary (salaries, present participle salarying; past and past participle salaried)

  1. To pay on the basis of a period of a week or longer, especially to convert from another form of compensation.
Translations
  • Spanish: salariar
Adjective

salary

  1. (obsolete) Saline.



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