satisfaction
Pronunciation
  • IPA: /sætɪsˈfækʃən/

Noun

satisfaction

  1. A fulfillment of a need or desire.
    He enjoyed the dish with great satisfaction. He'll order it again the next time he arrives.
  2. The pleasure obtained by such fulfillment.
    • This life is not for complaint, but for satisfaction.
    • 1907, Robert William Chambers, chapter I, in The Younger Set, New York, N.Y.: D. Appleton & Company, OCLC 24962326 ↗:
      Selwyn, sitting up rumpled and cross-legged on the floor, after having boloed Drina to everybody's exquisite satisfaction, looked around at the sudden rustle of skirts to catch a glimpse of a vanishing figure—a glimmer of ruddy hair and the white curve of a youthful face, half-buried in a muff.
  3. The source of such gratification.
  4. A reparation for an injury or loss.
  5. A vindication for a wrong suffered.
    The count demanded satisfaction in the form of a duel at dawn.
    • c. 1601–1602, William Shakespeare, “Twelfe Night, or VVhat You VVill”, in Mr. William Shakespeares Comedies, Histories, & Tragedies: Published According to the True Originall Copies (First Folio), London: Printed by Isaac Iaggard, and Ed[ward] Blount, published 1623, OCLC 606515358 ↗, [Act III, scene iv], page 269 ↗:
      He is knight dubb'd with vnhatche'd Rapier, and on carpet conſideration, but he is a diuell in priuate brawl#English|brall, soules and bodies hath he diuorc'd three, and his incenſement at this moment is ſo implacable, that ſatisfaction can be none, but by pangs of death and ſepulcher: Hob, nob, is his word: giu't or take't.
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