sauce
Pronunciation
  • (RP) IPA: /sɔːs/
  • (GA) IPA: /sɔs/, /sɑs/
Noun

sauce

  1. A liquid (often thickened) condiment or accompaniment to food.
    apple sauce; mint sauce
  2. (UK, Australia, India) Tomato sauce (similar to US tomato ketchup), as in:
    [meat] pie and [tomato] sauce
  3. (slang, usually “the”) Alcohol, booze.
    • 1960, P[elham] G[renville] Wodehouse, chapter XVII, in Jeeves in the Offing, London: Herbert Jenkins, OCLC 1227855 ↗:
      [...] she was thinking of her first husband, who was a heel to end all heels and a constant pain in the neck to her till one night he most fortunately walked into the River Thames while under the influence of the sauce and didn't come up for days.
    Maybe you should lay off the sauce.
  4. (bodybuilding) Anabolic steroids.
  5. (art) A soft crayon for use in stump drawing or in shading with the stump.
  6. (internet slang) Alternative form of source, often used when requesting the source of an image or other posted material.
  7. (dated) Cheek; impertinence; backtalk; sass.
  8. (US, obsolete slang, 1800s) Vegetables.
  9. (obsolete, UK, US, dialect) Any garden vegetables eaten with meat.
    • Roots, herbs, vine fruits, and salad flowers […] they dish up various ways, and find them very delicious sauce to their meats, both roasted and boiled, fresh and salt.
    • 1830, Joseph Plumb Martin, A Narrative of Some of the Adventures, Dangers and Sufferings of a Revolutionary Soldier, Ch. VIII:
      The first night of our expedition, we boiled our meat; and I asked the landlady for a little sauce, she told me to go to the garden and take as much cabbage as I pleased, and that, boiled with the meat, was all we could eat.
Synonyms Translations Translations Verb

sauce (sauces, present participle saucing; past and past participle sauced)

  1. To add sauce to; to season.
  2. To cause to relish anything, as if with a sauce; to tickle or gratify, as the palate; to please; to stimulate.
    • c. 1605–1608, William Shakespeare, “The Life of Tymon of Athens”, in Mr. William Shakespeares Comedies, Histories, & Tragedies: Published According to the True Originall Copies (First Folio), London: Printed by Isaac Iaggard, and Ed[ward] Blount, published 1623, OCLC 606515358 ↗, [Act IV, scene iii]:
      Earth, yield me roots; / Who seeks for better of thee, sauce his palate / With thy most operant poison!
  3. To make poignant; to give zest, flavour or interest to; to set off; to vary and render attractive.
    • Then fell she to sauce her desires with threatenings.
  4. (colloquial) To treat with bitter, pert, or tart language; to be impudent or saucy to.
    • c. 1598–1600, William Shakespeare, “As You Like It”, in Mr. William Shakespeares Comedies, Histories, & Tragedies: Published According to the True Originall Copies (First Folio), London: Printed by Isaac Iaggard, and Ed[ward] Blount, published 1623, OCLC 606515358 ↗, [Act III, scene v]:
      I'll sauce her with bitter words.
Translations
  • Spanish: salsear



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