saving
Pronunciation
  • IPA: /ˈseɪvɪŋ/
Noun

saving

  1. A reduction in cost or expenditure.
    The shift of the supplier gave us a saving of 10 percent.
  2. (countable, usually, in the plural) Something (usually money) that is saved, particularly money that has been set aside for the future.
    I invested all my savings in gold.
    The collapse of Enron wiped out the life savings of many people, leaving them poor in their retirement.
  3. (uncountable) The action of the verb to save.
  4. (obsolete) exception; reservation
    • Contend not with those that are too strong for us, but still with a saving to honesty.
Translations Translations Translations
  • Russian: эконо́мия
Verb
  1. present participle of save#English|save
Adjective

saving

  1. (theology) That saves someone from damnation; redemptive. [from 14th c.]
  2. Preserving; rescuing.
    • 1611, The Holy Bible, […] (King James Version), imprinted at London: By Robert Barker, […], OCLC 964384981 ↗, Psalms 28:8 ↗:
      He is the saving strength of his anointed.
  3. Thrifty; frugal. [from 15th c.]
    a saving cook
    • 1932, Lewis Grassic Gibbon, Sunset Song, Polygon 2006 (A Scots Quair), p. 14:
      Three of her bairns were drowned at sea, fishing off the Bervie braes they had been, but the fourth, the boy Cospatric, him that died the same day as the Old Queen, he was douce and saving and sensible, and set putting the estate to rights.
  4. Bringing back in returns or in receipts the sum expended; incurring no loss, though not gainful.
    a saving bargain
    The ship has made a saving voyage.
  5. Making reservation or exception.
    a saving clause
  6. (in compound adjectives) relating to making a saving: e.g. labour-saving, energy-saving light bulbs.
Preposition
  1. With the exception of; except; save.
    • Bible, Revelation ii. 17
      And in the stone a new name written, which no man knoweth saving he that receiveth it.
  2. Without disrespect to.
      • c. 1596–1598, William Shakespeare, “The Merchant of Venice”, in Mr. William Shakespeares Comedies, Histories, & Tragedies: Published According to the True Originall Copies (First Folio), London: Printed by Isaac Iaggard, and Ed[ward] Blount, published 1623, OCLC 606515358 ↗, [Act II, scene ii]:
        I should be ruled by the fiend, who, saving your reverence, is the devil himself.
  3. Saving your presence.



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