scandalous
Pronunciation
  • (America) IPA: /ˈskændələs/
Adjective

scandalous

  1. wrong, immoral, causing a scandal
    • 1671, John Milton, “Samson Agonistes, […]”, in Paradise Regain’d. A Poem. In IV Books. To which is Added, Samson Agonistes, London: Printed by J. M[acock] for John Starkey […], OCLC 228732398 ↗, lines 415–420, page 83 ↗:
      Maſters commands come with a power reſiſtleſs / To ſuch as owe them abſolute ſubjection; / And for a life who will not change his purpoſe? / (So mutable are all the ways of men) / Yet this be ſure, in nothing to comply / Scandalous or forbidden in our Law.
    • 1884, Mark Twain, Adventures of Huckleberry Finn
      The thing made a big stir in the town, too, and a good many come out flatfooted and said it was scandalous to separate the mother and the children that way.
  2. malicious, defamatory.
    • 1592, Thomas Kyd, The Spanish Tragedie
      These be the scandalous reports of such / As loves not me, and hate my lord too much.
    • 1887, Marie Corelli, Thelma
      I always disregard gossip--it is generally scandalous, and seldom true.
  3. Outrageous; exceeding reasonable limits.
Translations Translations


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