security
Pronunciation
  • (RP) IPA: /sɪˈkjʊəɹəti/, /sɪˈkjɔːɹəti/
  • (America) IPA: /səˈkjɔɹ.ɪˌti/, [səˈkjɔɹ.ɪˌɾi], /səˈkjʊɹ.ɪˌti/, [səˈkjʊɹ.ɪˌɾi]
Noun

security

  1. (uncountable) The condition of not being threatened, especially physically, psychologically, emotionally, or financially.
    • c. 1606–1607, William Shakespeare, “The Tragedie of Anthonie and Cleopatra”, in Mr. William Shakespeares Comedies, Histories, & Tragedies: Published According to the True Originall Copies (First Folio), London: Printed by Isaac Iaggard, and Ed[ward] Blount, published 1623, OCLC 606515358 ↗, [Act III, scene vii]:
      Give up yourself merely to chance and hazard, / From firm security.
    • 1712, Jonathan Swift, The Conduct of the Allies, and of the late Ministry, in beginning and carrying on the present War
      Some […] alleged […] }that we could have no security for our trade.
  2. (countable) Something that secures.
  3. An organization or department responsible for providing security by enforcing laws, rules, and regulations as well as maintaining order.
  4. (legal) Something that secures the fulfillment of an obligation or law.
  5. (legal) Freedom from apprehension.
  6. (finance, often used in plural) A tradeable financial asset, such as a share of stock.W
  7. (finance) Proof of ownership of stocks, bonds or other investment instruments.
  8. (finance) Property etc. temporarily relinquished to guarantee repayment of a loan.
  9. A guarantee.
    • 18, Thomas Babington Macaulay, chapter 12, in The History of England from the Accession of James the Second, volume (please specify ), London: Longman, Brown, Green, and Longmans, OCLC 1069526323 ↗:
  10. (obsolete) Carelessness; negligence.
    • 1595 December 9 (first known performance)​, William Shakespeare, “The life and death of King Richard the Second”, in Mr. William Shakespeares Comedies, Histories, & Tragedies: Published According to the True Originall Copies (First Folio), London: Printed by Isaac Iaggard, and Ed[ward] Blount, published 1623, OCLC 606515358 ↗, [Act III, scene ii]:
      He means, my lord, that we are too remiss,
      Whilst Bolingbroke, through our security,
      Grows strong and great in substance and in power.
Synonyms Antonyms Translations Translations Translations Translations Translations
  • French: titre négociable, papier-valeur (Luxembourg, Switzerland)
  • German: Wertpapier
  • Italian: cartevalori
  • Portuguese: garantia
  • Russian: поручи́тельство
  • Spanish: título valor
Translations


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