shake hands
Verb

shake hands

  1. To grasp another person's hands as an expression of greeting, farewell, agreement, etc.
    • 1907, Robert William Chambers, chapter II, in The Younger Set, New York, N.Y.: D. Appleton & Company, OCLC 24962326 ↗:
      Gerald was enthusiastic. After a while they shook hands, it being time to separate. And for a long time Selwyn sat there alone in the visitors' room, absent-eyed, facing the blazing fire of cannel coal.
Related terms Translations
  • French: serrer la main
  • German: Hände schütteln
  • Italian: stringere la mano
  • Portuguese: apertar as mãos
  • Russian: пожима́ть рука
Noun

shake hands

  1. (Ireland) an instance of shaking hands; a handshake
    • 1834, William Carleton, "Shane Fadh's Wedding", Traits and Stories of the Irish Peasantry, Volume 1, p.178 ↗ (W. F. Wakeman):
      Many a shake hands did I get from the neighbours’ sons, wishing me joy
    • 1909, Frederick Lawton, translation of Jules Verne, The Chase of the Golden Meteor, p.44 (London: Grant Richards)
      He exchanged greetings with his rival, but their shake-hands was rather a cold one, and each looked the other askance, as if distrust was in their hearts.
    • 1967 July 27, Jack McQuillan, Livestock Marts Bill, 1967: Second Stage (Resumed). ↗ Seanad Debates, Vol.63 No.12 p.4 col.928:
      It was the first time a Minister ever left the country without a ceremonial goodbye and a shake hands at the airport, with the tall hats being doffed.
    • 2015 February 1, Brian D'Arcy, quoted in Cork Examiner "Terry Wogan's friend Father Brian D'Arcy tells of their emotional final handshake" ↗:
      I wasn’t sure if it was goodbye, but as soon as I saw Terry I knew it was the last time I was going to see him, and the shake hands was the last shake hands I’d ever have with him.



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