shroud
Pronunciation
  • IPA: /ʃɹaʊd/
Noun

shroud (plural shrouds)

  1. That which clothes, covers, conceals, or protects; a garment.
    • swaddled, as new born, in sable shrouds
  2. Especially, the dress for the dead; a winding sheet.
    • 1826, Mary Shelley, The Last Man, volume 3, chapter 2
      Yet let us goǃ England is in her shroud - we may not enchain ourselves to a corpse.
    • c. 1591–1595, William Shakespeare, “The Tragedie of Romeo and Ivliet”, in Mr. William Shakespeares Comedies, Histories, & Tragedies: Published According to the True Originall Copies (First Folio), London: Printed by Isaac Iaggard, and Ed[ward] Blount, published 1623, OCLC 606515358 ↗, [Act IV, scene i]:
      a dead man in his shroud
  3. That which covers or shelters like a shroud.
    • Jura answers through her misty shroud.
  4. A covered place used as a retreat or shelter, as a cave or den; also, a vault or crypt.
    • The shroud to which he won / His fair-eyed oxen.
    • a vault, or shroud, as under a church
  5. (nautical) A rope or cable serving to support the mast sideways.
  6. One of the two annular plates at the periphery of a water wheel, which form the sides of the buckets; a shroud plate.
Synonyms Translations Translations
  • French: hauban
  • German: Want
  • Italian: sartia
  • Portuguese: brandal
  • Russian: ва́нты
  • Spanish: obenquillo
Verb

shroud (shrouds, present participle shrouding; past and past participle shrouded)

  1. To cover with a shroud.
    • 1626, Francis Bacon, Sylva Sylvarum, Or, A Naturall Historie: In Ten Centuries
      The ancient Egyptian mummies were shrouded in a number of folds of linen besmeared with gums.
  2. To conceal or hide from view, as if by a shroud.
    The details of the plot were shrouded in mystery.
    The truth behind their weekend retreat was shrouded in obscurity.
    • 1614, Walter Raleigh, Historie of the World
      One of these trees, with all his young ones, may shroud four hundred horsemen.
    • Some tempest rise, / And blow out all the stars that light the skies, / To shroud my shame.
  3. To take shelter or harbour.
    • 1634 October 9 (first performance), [John Milton], H[enry] Lawes, editor, A Maske Presented at Ludlow Castle, 1634: […] [Comus], London: Printed [by Augustine Matthews] for Hvmphrey Robinson, […], published 1637, OCLC 228715864 ↗; reprinted as Comus: […] (Dodd, Mead & Company’s Facsimile Reprints of Rare Books; Literature Series; no. I), New York, N.Y.: Dodd, Mead & Company, 1903, OCLC 1113942837 ↗:
      If your stray attendance be yet lodged, / Or shroud within these limits.
Translations Noun

shroud (plural shrouds)

  1. The branching top of a tree; foliage.
Verb

shroud (shrouds, present participle shrouding; past and past participle shrouded)

  1. (transitive, UK, dialect) To lop the branches from (a tree).
    Synonyms: shrood



This text is extracted from the Wiktionary and it is available under the CC BY-SA 3.0 license | Terms and conditions | Privacy policy 0.006
Offline English dictionary