smack
Pronunciation Noun

smack

  1. A distinct flavor, especially if slight.
    rice pudding with a smack of cinnamon
  2. A slight trace of something; a smattering.
    • 1883, Robert Louis Stevenson, Treasure Island
      He was not sailorly, and yet he had a smack of the sea about him too.
  3. (slang, uncountable) Heroin.
Translations Translations
  • Russian: при́вкус
Verb

smack (smacks, present participle smacking; past and past participle smacked)

  1. (transitive) To get the flavor of.
    • 1827, Thomas Carlyle (translator), Johann Karl August Musäus, "Melechsala" (1782-86); in German Romance I. 175
      He soon smacked the taste of physic hidden in this sweetness.
  2. (intransitive) To indicate or suggest something; used with of.
    Her reckless behavior smacks of pride.
    • c. 1603–1604, William Shakespeare, “Measvre for Measure”, in Mr. William Shakespeares Comedies, Histories, & Tragedies: Published According to the True Originall Copies (First Folio), London: Printed by Isaac Iaggard, and Ed[ward] Blount, published 1623, OCLC 606515358 ↗, [Act II, scene ii]:
      All sects, all ages, smack of this vice.
  3. (intransitive) To have a particular taste; used with of.
    • 1820-25, Charles Lamb, Essays of Elia
      He had his tea and hot rolls in a morning, while we were battening upon our quarter-of-a-penny loaf — our crug — moistened with attenuated small beer, in wooden piggings, smacking of the pitched leathern jack it was poured from.
Noun

smack (plural smacks)

  1. A small sailing vessel, commonly rigged as a sloop, used chiefly in the coasting and fishing trade and often called a fishing smack
  2. A group of jellyfish.
Translations
  • German: Schmack
  • Spanish: sumaca
Noun

smack (plural smacks)

  1. A sharp blow; a slap. See also: spank.
  2. The sound of a loud kiss.
    • c. 1590–1592, William Shakespeare, “The Taming of the Shrew”, in Mr. William Shakespeares Comedies, Histories, & Tragedies: Published According to the True Originall Copies (First Folio), London: Printed by Isaac Iaggard, and Ed[ward] Blount, published 1623, OCLC 606515358 ↗, [Act III, scene ii]:
      he took the bride about the neck. And kissed her lips with such a clamorous smack.
  3. A quick, sharp noise, as of the lips when suddenly separated, or of a whip.
Translations
  • Russian: шлепо́к
  • Spanish: sopapo, soplamocos
Verb

smack (smacks, present participle smacking; past and past participle smacked)

  1. To slap someone.
  2. To make a smacking sound.
    • A horse neighed, and a whip smacked, there was a whistle, and the sound of a cart wheel.
  3. (New Zealand) To strike a child (usually on the buttocks) as a form of discipline. (US spank)
  4. To wetly separate the lips, making a noise, after tasting something or in expectation of a treat.
    • 1763, Robert Lloyd, “A Familiar Epistle” in St. James Magazine:
      But when, obedient to the mode / Of panegyric, courtly ode / The bard bestrides, his annual hack, / In vain I taste, and sip and smack, / I find no flavour of the Sack.
  5. To kiss with a close compression of the lips, so as to make a sound when they separate.
Translations Translations
  • Russian: чмо́кать
Translations
  • Russian: чмокнуть
Adverb

smack (not comparable)

  1. As if with a smack or slap; smartly; sharply.
    Right smack bang in the middle.



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