sneap
Pronunciation Verb

sneap (sneaps, present participle sneaping; past and past participle sneaped)

  1. (transitive, dialectal) To check; reprove abruptly; reprimand; rebuke; chide.
  2. (transitive, dialectal) To nip; bite; pinch; blast; blight.
    • c. 1595–1596, William Shakespeare, “Loues Labour’s Lost”, in Mr. William Shakespeares Comedies, Histories, & Tragedies: Published According to the True Originall Copies (First Folio), London: Printed by Isaac Iaggard, and Ed[ward] Blount, published 1623, OCLC 606515358 ↗, [Act I, scene i]:
      King Ferdinand of Navarre; Berowne is like an envious sneaping frost, That bites the first born infants of the spring.
  3. (transitive, dialectal) To thwart; offend.
  4. (colloquial) To put someone's nose out of joint; offend.
    She was sneaped when she wasn't invited to his party.
Noun

sneap (plural sneaps)

  1. (obsolete) A reprimand; a rebuke.
    • c. 1596–1599, William Shakespeare, “The Second Part of Henry the Fourth, […]”, in Mr. William Shakespeares Comedies, Histories, & Tragedies: Published According to the True Originall Copies (First Folio), London: Printed by Isaac Iaggard, and Ed[ward] Blount, published 1623, OCLC 606515358 ↗, [Act II, scene i]:
      My lord, I will not undergo this sneap without reply.



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