soon
Pronunciation Adjective

soon (comparative sooner, superlative soonest)

  1. Short in length of time from the present.
    I need the soonest date you have available.
  2. (US, dialect) early
    • 1992, W. H. Andrews: A Paul Green Reader, p 129 ↗:
      Late in the evening we arrived at Quincy where we bivouacked for the night and taken a soon start the next morning to march to the arsenal.
    • 1997, Dorothy Stanaland Samuel, ‎Taliaferro Leslie Samuel: The Samuell/Samuel Families of Tidewater Virginia, p 148 ↗:
      Got up pretty early, ate a soon breakfast, had the sulky and was about to start to Newtown when it commenced raining..
    • 2000, Laurence G. Avery: A Paul Green Reader, p 220 ↗:
      They were different from colored folks who had to be out to get a soon start.
Adverb

soon (comparative sooner, superlative soonest)

  1. (obsolete) Immediately, instantly.
  2. Within a short time; quickly.
  3. (now, dialectal) Early.
    • 1611, King James Version of the Bible, Book of Exodus 2:18,
      How is it that ye are come so soon to day?
    • 1937, Zora Neale Hurston, Their Eyes Were Watching God, University of Illinois Press, 1978, Chapter 6, p. 87,
      “Been huntin’ fuh mah mule. Anybody seen ’im?” he asked.
      “Seen ’im soon dis mornin’ over behind de school-house,” Lum said. “’’Bout ten o’clock or so. He musta been out all night tuh be way over dere dat early.”
  4. Readily; willingly; used with would, or some other word expressing will.
    • 1713, Joseph Addison, The Guardian No. 101
      I would as soon see a river winding through woods or in meadows, as when it is tossed up in so many whimsical figures at Versailles.
Translations
Soon
Proper noun
  1. Surname



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