stone
Pronunciation
  • (RP) IPA: /stəʊn/
  • (GA) IPA: /stoʊn/
  • (New Zealand) IPA: /stɐʉn/
Noun

stone (see usage notes)

  1. (uncountable) A hard earthen substance that can form large rocks.
  2. A small piece of stone, a pebble.
  3. A gemstone, a jewel, especially a diamond.
    • c. 1593, William Shakespeare, “The Tragedy of Richard the Third: […]”, in Mr. William Shakespeares Comedies, Histories, & Tragedies: Published According to the True Originall Copies (First Folio), London: Printed by Isaac Iaggard, and Ed[ward] Blount, published 1623, OCLC 606515358 ↗, [Act I, scene iv]:
      inestimable stones, unvalued jewels
  4. (British, plural: stone) A unit of mass equal to 14 pounds. Used to measure the weights of people, animals, cheese, wool, etc. 1 stone ≈ 6.3503 kilograms
  5. (botany) The central part of some fruits, particularly drupes; consisting of the seed and a hard endocarp layer.
    a peach stone
  6. (medicine) A hard, stone-like deposit.
    kidney stone
  7. (board games) A playing piece made of any hard material, used in various board games such as backgammon, and go.
  8. A dull light grey or beige, like that of some stones.
     
  9. (curling) A 42-pound, precisely shaped piece of granite with a handle attached, which is bowled down the ice.
  10. A monument to the dead; a gravestone or tombstone.
    • 1717, Alexander Pope, Eloisa to Abelard:
      Should some relenting eye / Glance on the stone where our cold relics lie.
    • Seems to me that when I die these words will be written on my stone
  11. (obsolete) A mirror, or its glass.
    • c. 1603–1606, William Shakespeare, “The Tragedie of King Lear”, in Mr. William Shakespeares Comedies, Histories, & Tragedies: Published According to the True Originall Copies (First Folio), London: Printed by Isaac Iaggard, and Ed[ward] Blount, published 1623, OCLC 606515358 ↗, [Act V, scene iii]:
      Lend me a looking-glass; / If that her breath will mist or stain the stone, / Why, then she lives.
  12. (obsolete) A testicle.
  13. (dated, printing) A stand or table with a smooth, flat top of stone, commonly marble, on which to arrange the pages of a book, newspaper, etc. before printing; also called imposing stone.
Synonyms Translations Translations Translations Translations
  • French: stone
  • Russian: сто́ун
Translations Translations Translations
  • German: Stein
  • Portuguese: peça
  • Russian: ка́мень
Verb

stone (stones, present participle stoning; past and past participle stoned)

  1. (transitive) To pelt with stones, especially to kill by pelting with stones.
    She got stoned to death after they found her.
  2. (transitive) To wall with stones.
  3. (transitive) To remove a stone from (fruit etc.).
  4. (intransitive) To form a stone during growth, with reference to fruit etc.
  5. (transitive, slang) To intoxicate, especially with narcotics. (Usually in passive)
  6. (intransitive, Singapore, slang) To do nothing, to stare blankly into space and not pay attention when relaxing or when bored.
  7. (transitive) To lap with an abrasive stone to remove surface irregularities.
Synonyms Translations Translations Translations Adjective

stone (not comparable)

  1. Constructed of stone.
    stone walls
    Synonyms: stonen
  2. Having the appearance of stone.
    stone pot
  3. Of a dull light grey or beige, like that of some stones.
  4. (AAVE) Used as an intensifier.
    She is one stone fox.
  5. (LGBT) Willing to give sexual pleasure but not to receive it.
    stone butch; stone femme
    Antonyms: pillow princess
Translations Translations Adverb

stone (not comparable)

  1. As a stone (used with following adjective).
    My father is stone deaf. This soup is stone cold.
  2. (slang) Absolutely, completely (used with following adjectives).
    I went stone crazy after she left.
    I said the medication made my vision temporarily blurry, it did not make me stone blind.
    The Stylistics performed a love song titled "I'm Stone in Love with You".

Stone
Proper noun
  1. Surname, for someone who lived near a stone worked with stone, from Old English stan.
  2. A locale in England.
    1. A market town in Stafford, Staffordshire (OS grid ref SJ9034).
    2. A village in Buckinghamshire.
    3. A village in Gloucestershire.
    4. A village in Kent.
    5. A village in Worcestershire.
  3. A locale in US.
    1. An unincorporated community in California.
    2. An unincorporated community in Indiana.
    3. An unincorporated community in Kentucky, ;.
    4. An unincorporated community in Wisconsin.
Translations


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