stoop
Pronunciation
  • (British, America) IPA: /stuːp/
Noun

stoop (plural stoops)

  1. (chiefly, Northeastern US, chiefly, New York, also, Canada) The staircase and landing or porch leading to the entrance of a residence.
    Synonyms: porch, verandah
    • 1856 James Fenimore Cooper, Satanstoe or The Littlepage Manuscripts: A Tale of the Colony (London, 1856) page 110 ↗
      Nearly all the houses were built with their gables to the streets and each had heavy wooden Dutch stoops, with seats, at its door.
    • 1905 Carpentry and Building, vol. 27 (January 1905), NY: David Williams Company, page 2 ↗
      ...the entrance being at the side of the house and reached by a low front stoop with four or five risers...
  2. (US) The threshold of a doorway, a doorstep.
    Synonyms: step, doorstep
Related terms Translations Verb

stoop (stoops, present participle stooping; past and past participle stooped)

  1. To bend the upper part of the body forward and downward to a half-squatting position; crouch.
    He stooped to tie his shoe-laces.
    • 1900, Charles W. Chesnutt, The House Behind the Cedars, Chapter I,
      Their walk had continued not more than ten minutes when they crossed a creek by a wooden bridge and came to a row of mean houses standing flush with the street. At the door of one, an old black woman had stooped to lift a large basket, piled high with laundered clothes.
  2. To lower oneself; to demean or do something below one's status, standards, or morals.
    Can you believe that a salesman would stoop so low as to hide his customers' car keys until they agreed to the purchase?
  3. Of a bird of prey: to swoop down on its prey.
    • 1882 [1875], Thomas Bewick, James Reiveley, William Harvey, The Parlour Menagerie, 4th ed., p. 63 ↗:
      Presently the bird stooped and seized a salmon, and a violent struggle ensued.
  4. (transitive) To cause to incline downward; to slant.
    to stoop a cask of liquor
  5. (transitive) To cause to submit; to prostrate.
    • Many of those whose states so tempt thine ears / Are stooped by death; and many left alive.
  6. To yield; to submit; to bend, as by compulsion; to assume a position of humility or subjection.
    • 1668, John Dryden, Annus Mirabilis: The Year of Wonders, M. DC. LXVI. […], London: Printed for Henry Herringman, […], OCLC 1064438096 ↗, (please specify the stanza number):
      Mighty in her ships stood Carthage long, […] / Yet stooped to Rome, less wealthy, but more strong.
    • 1713, Joseph Addison, Cato, published 1712, [Act 1, scene 1]:
      These are arts, my prince, / In which your Zama does not stoop to Rome.
  7. To descend from rank or dignity; to condescend.
    • She stoops to conquer.
    • 1625, Francis Bacon, Of Riches
      Where men of great wealth do stoop to husbandry, it multiplieth riches exceedingly.
  8. To degrade.
Synonyms Translations Translations Translations Noun

stoop (plural stoops)

  1. A stooping, bent position of the body.
    The old man walked with a stoop.
    • 2011, Phil McNulty, Euro 2012: Montenegro 2-2 England
      Theo Walcott's final pass has often drawn criticism but there could be no complaint in the 11th minute when his perfect delivery to the far post only required a stoop and a nod of the head from Young to put England ahead.
  2. An accelerated descent in flight, as that for an attack.
    • 1819, Washington Irving, Bracebridge Hall: Hawking:
      At length the hawk got the upper hand, and made a rushing stoop at her quarry
Translations
  • French: piqué
  • Russian: пике́
Noun

stoop (plural stoops)

  1. (dialect) A post or pillar, especially a gatepost or a support in a mine.
Noun

stoop (plural stoops)

  1. A vessel for holding liquids; a flagon.



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