syntony
Noun

syntony (uncountable)

  1. (electronics) A condition in which two oscillators have the same resonant frequency.
    • 1908, United States Congressional Serial Set, page 23 ↗,
      In practice, perfectly accurate syntony is not necessary, but some variation in a wave length may be permitted and good results at the receiver will still be attained.
  2. A syntonic state.
    • 1969, Carlo Luigi Golino (editor), Italian Quarterly, Volume 13, page 27 ↗,
      Betti has dealt with the XXIX Canto of Paradiso in a commentary marked by an extreme richness of spiritual syntonies.
    • 1992, Michele Bezoari, Antonio Ferro, From a play between "parts" to transformations in the couple: psychoanalysis in a bipersonal field, Luciana Nissim Momigliano, Andreina Robutti, Shared Experience: The Psychoanalytic Dialogue, page 54 ↗,
      Rather, it seems to us that the analyst's priority should be to foster the progressive interaction of these areas into the couple's communicative work, so as to arrive, through successive transformations of what we have called functional aggregates, at a shared vision and an experience of emotional syntony relative to what occurs in the field.
    • 2007 January 25, London Review of Books, p12,
      Official demographers hasten to point out that high mortality rates were already a feature of the Brezhnev period, while low fertility rates are after all a sign of social advance, in syntony with Western Europe.



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