telegraph
Pronunciation
  • (British) IPA: /ˈtɛl.ə.ɡɹæf/, /ˈtɛl.ɪ.ɡɹæf/
Noun

telegraph (plural telegraphs)

  1. (historical) An apparatus, or a process, for communicating rapidly between distant points, especially by means of established visible or audible signals representing words or ideas, or by means of words and signs, transmitted by electrical means.
    • 1920, Mary Roberts Rinehart; Avery Hopwood, chapter I, in The Bat: A Novel from the Play (Dell Book; 241), New York, N.Y.: Dell Publishing Company, OCLC 20230794 ↗, [https://babel.hathitrust.org/cgi/pt?id=hvd.hwptej;view=1up;seq=5 page 01]:
      The Bat—they called him the Bat. […]. He […] played a lone hand, […]. Most lone wolves had a moll at any rate—women were their ruin—but if the Bat had a moll, not even the grapevine telegraph could locate her.
  2. (video games) A visible or audible cue that indicates to an opponent the action that a character is about to take.
Related terms Translations Verb

telegraph (telegraphs, present participle telegraphing; past and past participle telegraphed)

  1. To send a message by telegraph.
  2. To give nonverbal signals to another, as with gestures or a change in attitude.
    Her frown telegraphed her displeasure.
  3. To show one's intended action unintentionally.
Translations


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