thee
see also: Thee
Pronunciation Pronoun
  1. (now, chiefly, archaic, literary) Objective and reflexive case of thou. [from 8th c.]
    • 1598, Shakespeare, Henry IV part 1, 1.2.49-50:
      Prince Henry: Did I ever call for thee to pay thy part?
      Falstaff: No; I'll give thee thy due, thou hast paid all there.
  2. (now, chiefly, archaic, dialect) Thou. [from 12th c.]
    • 1773, Frances Burney, Journals & Letters, Penguin 2001, p. 23:
      [H]e immediately perceived when I was taken ill, and, after seeing Mama, said to me ‘I am afraid Thee art not well thyself?’
    • 1852, Harriet Beecher Stowe, Uncle Tom's Cabin:
      ‘What does thee want, father?’ said Rachel.
Translations
  • French: (informal and addressing one person; used after a preposition) toi, (informal and addressing one person; used before a verb) te
  • German: dich, dir
  • Italian: (informal and addressing one person; used after a preposition) te, (informal and addressing one person; used before a verb) ti
  • Portuguese: tu, ti
  • Russian: тебя́
  • Spanish: te, ti
Verb

thee (thees, present participle theeing; past and past participle theed)

  1. (transitive) To address#Verb|address (a person) using the pronoun thee.
    Synonyms: thou
  2. (intransitive) To use#Verb|use the word#Noun|word thee.
    Synonyms: thou
Pronunciation Verb

thee (thees, present participle theeing; past and past participle theed)

  1. (intransitive, UK, obsolete) To thrive; prosper.
    • Well mote thee, as well can wish your thought.
Noun

thee (plural thees)

  1. The letter ⟨(⟩, which stands for the th sound IPAchar /ð/ in Pitman shorthand.
Related terms
  • ith
  • eth, the name of the IPA letter for this sound

Thee
Pronoun
  1. Honorific alternative letter-case form of thee, sometimes used when referring to God or another important figure who is understood from context.



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