through
Pronunciation
  • (RP) IPA: /θɹuː/, [θɾ̪̊ɵʉ]
  • (GA) IPA: /θɹu/, [θɾ̪̊ʊu]

Preposition
  1. From one side of an opening to the other.
    I went through the window.
  2. Entering, then later leaving.
    I drove through the town at top speed without looking left or right.
    • 1892, Walter Besant, “Prologue: Who is Edmund Gray?”, in The Ivory Gate: A Novel, New York, N.Y.: Harper & Brothers, […], OCLC 16832619 ↗, page 16 ↗:
      Athelstan Arundel walked home all the way, foaming and raging. […] He walked the whole way, walking through crowds, and under the noses of dray-horses, carriage-horses, and cart-horses, without taking the least notice of them.
    • 1914, Louis Joseph Vance, chapter III, in Nobody, New York, N.Y.: George H[enry] Doran Company, published 1915, OCLC 40817384 ↗:
      Turning back, then, toward the basement staircase, she began to grope her way through blinding darkness, but had taken only a few uncertain steps when, of a sudden, she stopped short and for a little stood like a stricken thing, quite motionless save that she quaked to her very marrow in the grasp of a great and enervating fear.
  3. Surrounded by (while moving).
    We slogged through the mud for hours before turning back and giving up.
  4. By means of.
    This team believes in winning through intimidation.
  5. In consequence of; as a result of.
    • 2012, Dimitri Yanuli, You Might Be Right, but You Ain't Right with the Word of God
      Our minds and hearts are corrupted with the Adamic virus at birth, and through a lifetime of sin and tragedy, our hearts and thoughts get more evil and more corrupted as we experience life's tragedies.
  6. (North America) To (or up to) and including, with all intermediate values.
    from 1945 through 1991;  the numbers 1 through 9;  your membership is active through March 15, 2013
Translations Translations Translations Translations
Adjective

through (not comparable)

  1. Passing from one side of something to the other.
    Interstate highways form a nationwide system of through roads.
    • 1994, Don A. Halperin, ‎G. Thomas Bible, Principles of Timber Design for Architects and Builders (page 137)
      It is possible to use a through bolt so that the bolt will be loaded axially, but usually axial loads are only components of the total load on the bolt.
  2. Finished; complete.
    They were through with laying the subroof by noon.
  3. Without a future; done for.
    After being implicated in the scandal, he was through as an executive in financial services.
  4. No longer interested; wearied or turned off by experience.
    She was through with him.
    • 1908, W[illiam] B[lair] M[orton] Ferguson, chapter I, in Zollenstein, New York, N.Y.: D. Appleton & Company, OCLC 731476803 ↗:
      “I'm through with all pawn-games,” I laughed. “Come, let us have a game of lansquenet. Either I will take a farewell fall out of you or you will have your sevenfold revenge”.
  5. Proceeding from origin to destination without delay due to change of equipment.
    The through flight through Memphis was the fastest.
  6. (association football) In possession of the ball beyond the last line of defence but not necessarily the goalkeeper; through on goal.
    • 2015, Steve Grossi, [https://web.archive.org/web/20161209023730/http://www.scottishfa.co.uk/scottish_fa_news.cfm?page=1986 SWFL1: Missed Chances See Swifts Relinquish Top Spot]
      With the Swifts calling for offside the striker was through and only a great save from McIlravey prevented the opener.

Adverb

through (not comparable)

  1. From one side to the other by way of the interior.
    The arrow went straight through.
  2. From one end to the other.
    Others slept; he worked straight through.
    She read the letter through.
  3. To the end.
    He said he would see it through.
  4. Completely.
    Leave the yarn in the dye overnight so the color soaks through.
  5. Out into the open.
    The American army broke through at St. Lo.

Noun

through (plural throughs)

  1. A large slab of stone laid in a dry-stone wall from one side to the other; a perpend.
Translations Pronunciation
  • IPA: /θɹʌf/, /θɹuː/

Noun

through (plural throughs)

  1. (obsolete) A coffin, sarcophagus or tomb of stone; a large slab of stone laid on a tomb.



This text is extracted from the Wiktionary and it is available under the CC BY-SA 3.0 license | Terms and conditions | Privacy policy 0.006
Offline English dictionary