tire
Pronunciation
  • (British) IPA: /ˈtaɪ̯ə(ɹ)/
  • (GA) IPA: /ˈtaɪ̯ɚ/, [ˈtʰaɪ̯ɚ]
    • (Southern US, Appalachia) IPA: /ˈtɑːɚ/
    • (Midwestern US, Canada) IPA: /ˈtʌɪ̯ɚ/
Verb

tire (tires, present participle tiring; past and past participle tired)

  1. (intransitive) To become sleepy or weary.
  2. (transitive) To make sleepy or weary.
  3. (intransitive) To become bored or impatient (with).
    I tire of this book.
  4. (transitive) To bore.
Synonyms Related terms Translations Translations Translations Translations
  • Italian: stancare
  • Russian: надоеда́ть
Noun

tire (plural tires)

  1. (obsolete) Accoutrements, accessories.
    • the tire of war
  2. (obsolete) Dress, clothes, attire.
    • 1590, Edmund Spenser, The Faerie Queene, I.vii:
      Ne spared they to strip her naked all. / Then when they had despoild her tire and call, / Such as she was, their eyes might her behold.
    • 1624, Democritus Junior [pseudonym; Robert Burton], The Anatomy of Melancholy: […], 2nd edition, Oxford, Oxfordshire: Printed by John Lichfield and James Short, for Henry Cripps, OCLC 54573970 ↗:
      , New York Review of Books 2001, p.66:
      men like apes follow the fashions in tires, gestures, actions: if the king laugh, all laugh […].
  3. A covering for the head; a headdress.
    • 1590, Edmund Spenser, The Faerie Queene, London: William Ponsonbie, Book 1, Canto 10, p. 144,
      And on her head she wore a tyre of gold,
  4. (American spelling) Metal rim of a wheel, especially that of a railroad locomotive.
  5. (American spelling, Canadian spelling) The rubber covering on a wheel; a tyre.
  6. A child's apron covering the upper part of the body, and tied with tape or cord; a pinafore. Also tier.
Verb

tire (tires, present participle tiring; past and past participle tired)

  1. (transitive, obsolete) To dress or adorn.
    • , 2 Kings ix. 30
      [Jezebel] painted her face, and tired her head.
Related terms
  • tiring-house
Translations Verb

tire (tires, present participle tiring; past and past participle tired)

  1. (obsolete) To seize, pull, and tear prey, as a hawk does.
    • 1593, William Shakespeare, Venus and Adonis
      Even as an empty eagle, sharp by fast, / Tires with her beak on feathers, flesh, and bone.
    • (Can we date this quote?), Francis Beaumont; John Fletcher, “The Honest Man's Fortune”, in Comedies and Tragedies […], London: Printed for Humphrey Robinson, […], and for Humphrey Moseley […], published 1647, OCLC 3083972 ↗, Act 2, scene 5:
      Ye dregs of baseness, vultures amongst men, / That tire upon the hearts of generous spirits.
  2. (obsolete) To seize, rend, or tear something as prey; to be fixed upon, or engaged with, anything.
    • 1616, George Chapman, Iliad
      Thus made she her remove, / And left wrath tyring on her son.
    • c. 1605–1608, William Shakespeare, Timon of Athens
      Upon that were my thoughts tiring.
Noun

tire (plural tires)

  1. A tier, row, or rank.
    • 1667, John Milton, “Book 6”, in Paradise Lost. A Poem Written in Ten Books, London: Printed [by Samuel Simmons], and are to be sold by Peter Parker […] [a]nd by Robert Boulter […] [a]nd Matthias Walker, […], OCLC 228722708 ↗; republished as Paradise Lost in Ten Books: The Text Exactly Reproduced from the First Edition of 1667: […], London: Basil Montagu Pickering […], 1873, OCLC 230729554 ↗:
      In posture to displode their second tire / Of thunder.



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