toll
Pronunciation
  • (British) IPA: /təʊl/, /tɒl/
  • (America) IPA: /toʊɫ/, /tɔl/
  • (Canada) IPA: /toʊl/, /tɑl/
Noun

toll (plural tolls)

  1. Loss or damage incurred through a disaster.
    The war has taken its toll on the people.
  2. A fee paid for some liberty or privilege, particularly for the privilege of passing over a bridge or on a highway, or for that of vending goods in a fair, market, etc.
  3. (business) A fee for using any kind of material processing service.
    We can handle on a toll basis your needs for spray drying, repackaging, crushing and grinding, and dry blending.
  4. (US) A tollbooth.
    We will be replacing some manned tolls with high-speed device readers.
  5. (UK, legal, obsolete) A liberty to buy and sell within the bounds of a manor.
  6. A portion of grain taken by a miller as a compensation for grinding.
Translations Translations
  • Portuguese: perda
  • Russian: потеря
Verb

toll (tolls, present participle tolling; past and past participle tolled)

  1. (transitive) To impose a fee for the use of.
    Once more it is proposed to toll the East River bridges.
  2. (ambitransitive) To levy a toll on (someone or something).
    • c. 1596, William Shakespeare, “The Life and Death of King Iohn”, in Mr. William Shakespeares Comedies, Histories, & Tragedies: Published According to the True Originall Copies (First Folio), London: Printed by Isaac Iaggard, and Ed[ward] Blount, published 1623, OCLC 606515358 ↗, [Act III, scene i]:
      No Italian priest / Shall tithe or toll in our dominions.
  3. (transitive) To take as a toll.
  4. To pay a toll or tallage.
Translations Noun

toll (plural tolls)

  1. The act or sound of tolling
Translations
  • French: sonnerie
  • Russian: (колоко́льный) звон
Verb

toll (tolls, present participle tolling; past and past participle tolled)

  1. (ergative) To ring (a bell) slowly and repeatedly.
    Martin tolled the great bell every day.
    Ask not for whom the bell tolls.
    • 1922 February, James Joyce, “[[Episode 12: The Cyclops]]”, in Ulysses, Paris: Shakespeare & Co.; Sylvia Beach, OCLC 560090630 ↗; republished London: Published for the Egoist Press, London by John Rodker, Paris, October 1922, OCLC 2297483 ↗:
      From the belfries far and near the funereal deathbell tolled unceasingly while all around the gloomy precincts rolled the ominous warning of a hundred muffled drums punctuated by the hollow booming of pieces of ordnance.
  2. (transitive) To summon by ringing a bell.
    The ringer tolled the workers back from the fields for vespers.
    • When hollow murmurs of their evening bells / Dismiss the sleepy swains, and toll them to their cells.
  3. (transitive) To announce by tolling.
    The bells tolled the King’s death.
    • Slow tolls the village clock the drowsy hour.
Translations
  • Russian: звони́ть
Translations Translations
  • Russian: бла́говестить
Verb

toll (tolls, present participle tolling; past and past participle tolled)

  1. (transitive, obsolete) To draw; pull; tug; drag.
  2. (transitive) To tear in pieces.
  3. (transitive) To draw; entice; invite; allure.
    Hou many virgins shal she tolle and drawe to þe Lord - "Life of Our Lady"
  4. (transitive) To lure with bait; tole (especially, fish and animals).
Synonyms Verb

toll (tolls, present participle tolling; past and past participle tolled)

  1. (legal, obsolete) To take away; to vacate; to annul.
  2. (legal) To suspend.
    The statute of limitations defense was tolled as a result of the defendant’s wrongful conduct.
Verb
  1. (AAVE) Simple past tense and past participle of tell
    I done toll you for the last time.

Toll
Proper noun
  1. Surname



This text is extracted from the Wiktionary and it is available under the CC BY-SA 3.0 license | Terms and conditions | Privacy policy 0.005
Offline English dictionary